MOFF’ THE HOOK

EXCLUSIVE 

Bobby’s UVF killers awarded immunity over daylight murder of loyalist gangster 

THE UVF killers of Bobby Moffett have been granted immunity.

One of the most notorious peace-time murders is set to remain unsolved as it has emerged those believed to be responsible have received so-called ‘comfort letters’ telling them they are no longer under investigation. The Sunday World understands those who ordered the murder and those who carried it out have been handed a get-of-jail-free-card. According to sources, UVF chief John ‘Bunter’ Graham is one of a handful of people believed to have been told they will live out their lives without the prospect of prosecution. Moffett, who was a member of the Red Hand Commando, a sister organisation of the UVF, was shot dead in broad daylight on the Shankill Road in North Belfast in May 2010. His funeral was one of the largest seen on the Shankill in living memory and sparked a backlash against the UVF.

BRUTAL 

Moffett’s murder was ordered and sanctioned at the highest level of the terror organisation. The low-level RHC member was murdered in the most brutal manner. Shot in the face twice by two loyalist terrorists using shotguns in broad daylight as he made his way to a meeting, his death sparked outrage in the loyalist heartland. It is now believed the UVF leadership have been assured they do not face police action. The assurances were given in the wake of the killing in an attempt to keep the UVF leadership on board the peace train. The issue of ‘comfort letters’ has been controversial with a number of high-profile IRA members benefiting-but less attention has been paid to loyalist killers. The Sunday World has previously revealed the UVF used immunity from prosecution as a bargaining chip in return for delivering the terror group’s move away from violence. 

The UVF has murdered more than 30 people since the organisation declared its ceasefire a quarter of a century ago. The revelation that British secret service agents have been protected and now afforded immunity will spark outrage. The security services used loyalist terror groups will remain hidden. Graham, who is in poor health, is believed to have worked for MI5 for more than 40 years and is understood to have campaigned for years for protection from prosecution for a raft of murders in return for a cessation of violence. The failure of his organisation to ‘transition’ from violence is known to have caused serious frustration at government level. Moffett’s murder  – among 32 others since their ceasefire – sparked the greatest controversy.

SHOTGUN 

The Sunday World understands that Graham, his second in command and a small clutch of others are in receipt of letters. The shotgun used to kill Moffett was stolen from a farmhouse in Co Antrim. The murder weapon was handed to low-level UVF operative Andy ‘Hard To Kill’ Aiken in the minutes after the shooting. Aiken, who was ostracized from the terror group and descended into a spiral of drug abuse, was found dead at a house in South Belfast 18 months ago. He had been arrested and questioned about the Moffett murder but was released without charge.

Aiken was one of the two killers and it was his contacts in the loyalist village area of South Belfast that helped destroy the gateaway car. Once a trusted UVF member, Aiken had been sidelined by the group as he turned increasingly to drink and drugs. It has been said the organisation became concerned that he could be vulnerable under interrogation due to his addictions. The UVF’s continued involvement in violence has been a major issue in the corridors of power and the revelation that senior figures have been granted state sanctuary is understood to have created friction within the security services. According to sources the issue of comfort letters has ‘clouded the waters’ and has made tackling legacy issues difficult. The failure to press cases against the UVF leadership has raised questions about what the British government and security services have to hide. Loyalist paramilitary sources have told the Sunday World that the Moffett murder was supposed to be a watershed, but became a roadblock because of assurances given to alleged agents such as Graham.

UNSOLVED 

The view has been backed up by security services who claim a raft of unsolved murders will remain ‘on the books’ because of the use of British agents and so-called comfort letters. “If anyone thinks these issues and cases will be resolved then think again. “The [British] government has made promises and they have to stick by them, it works for them and works for the UVF.”

With many thanks to: Richard Sullivan for the EXCLUSIVE original story for the Sunday World –richard.sullivan.sundayworld.com

Follow these links to find out more: https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/murder-of-loyalist-bobby-moffet-is-to-show-uvf-wont-be-messed-around-28538782.html

2-: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-30199553

3-: https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2010/jun/04/ireland-troubles-moffett-funeral

The DUP’s and Orange Orders love for Loyalist terrorism “You couldn’t make it up” and don’t mention anything to do with Catholics or Jews

Newly elected DUP Councillor Marc Collins Mid Ulster and East Antrim Borough Council

Conversation
pinkmiss
@LynneCampbell5
We have suffered years of Tory DUP austerity the possible sell off of our NHS which they jointly voted not too protect and what do the OO do about it, nothing! but Tory DUP sea border and they wreck what’s left of the union time for UI is near
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@BBCNewsNI
Unionism must consider a campaign of civil disobedience against Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal, a leading Orangeman has said: bbc.in/2XVZkiF
9:34 PM · Nov 28, 2019Twitter for Android

Conversation

peter gilmartin liked

Botty Bolingoli

@BottyBolingoli
So. Anywhere else. Substitute Israel/Islam for Celtic and Jewish/Muslim for Fenian. What do you think would happen? Media outcry. Arrests. Court cases. In Scotland. Oh STFU Timmy. It’s just banter.

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12:54 PM · Nov 28, 2019Twitter for iPhone
With many thanks to: Pink Miss for the original posting on Twitter-@LynneCampbell5

If we unionists are not prepared to take responsibility for our future it will be taken out of our hands by people who will go over our heads

A letter that was sent into the Belfast News Letter

Letters to the Editor

Unionism has been betrayed by their ‘Tory Friends’ and now when we should be devoting our time and energy searching for a home we have the unedifying spectacle of the unionist community squabbling and bitching like adolescent school children.

Prime Minister of Great Britain Boris Johnson

Instead of providing leadership we are witnessing an ongoing tragedy played out by light-weight politicians and their camp followers engaged in raking over the past, settling old scores and apportioning blame as “the vultures” are gathering to devour them.

Vote Nigel Dodds, #UDA1

If Boris has done nothing else, and he has done little, he has brought into much sharper focus what the unionist community has always known, we are only as British as mainland Britain says we are; and a majority of them believe we are expendable.

Our future and the future of our children resides at Westminster and is at the whim of fickle and unscrupulous politicians who see us as a bargaining chip to be used as a makeweight, and added to tip the balance in their scramble for power.

We are mere pawns to be sacrificed as Britain and Europe move us across the board to bring more powerful pieces into play.

The situation is so reminiscent of 1912, but we had leaders then and a united and God fearing people. We now worship mammon and a myriad of other gods and live in hope they bring comfort and ease our pain.

We need leaders who have vision and are capable of thinking outside the box, even thinking the unthinkable, but prepared to play hardball to protect our traditions, our faith and our culture.

With one or two exceptions, we don’t have them.

If we are not prepared to take responsibility for our future it will be taken out of our hands by people who will go over our heads, have no scruples in looking after self-interest and treat us with the contempt they feel we deserve.

The Protestant community lost its dignity and self-respect a long time ago and is now in mortal danger of losing its soul. I’m not convinced our politicians are capable of steering us through this crisis; some of the candidates chosen to fight this election are better equipped for comedy. As for the smaller parties they don’t even know there is a crisis.

When it’s all over they’ll continue to celebrate in North Down at the winter solstice.

As things stand we have been cast adrift, are hostage to fortune and at the mercy of the political elements.

Clive Maxwell, Bleary

With many thanks to the: Belfast News Letter for the original story 

Men caught with UDA documents, balaclavas and gloves told to “grow up”

Judge Neil Rafferty told the pair it was time for them to “grow up”

Brian David Dean at Belfast Crown Court on Friday where he was sentenced for possession of three balaclavas and documents likely to be of use to terrorists

A man who was caught with balacavas and UDA documents was jailed yesterday as a judge told him and his co-accused to “grow up”.

Judge Neil Rafferty branded those who persist in living in the terrorist past as “wrong-headed”.

He told Desmond John William Lundy, 41, and 52-year-old Brian David Dean: “Both of you have reached an age where it is long since past time for you to grow up and put away childish things.

“Such days are in the past and in the past [they] must remain.

“Terrorism, from whatever extreme, from either side, is a scourge and blight on our community.”

The pair had initially been charged with being, or proporting to be members of the UDA but this was not proceeded with after they pleaded guilty to possessing articles and documents useful to terrorists.

They included balaclavas, gloves and jackets with UDA emblems and documents, some to be used in a form of “swearing-in” ceremony “for those foolish to consider joining such an organisation”.

Judge Rafferty told Belfast Crown Court some of the documents were “almost laughable” in that the section identifying the UDA and UFF was left out but which was something even “a child would have made out”.

Prosecutor Sam Magee said Lundy and Dean’s fingerprints were found on the documents which included a “Code of Conduct of the Ulster Defence Association”, a “Plegde of Allegence” to the terror group and a copy of the “Monkstown Agreement”– allegedly between the UDA, UVF and Red Hand Commandos.

Lundy, of Abbey Ring, Holywood, Co Down, who had possessed 10 balaclavas, 18 pairs of black gloves and multiple UDA emblemed jackets, in addition to the documents, was sentenced to 15 months, split equally between custody and parole.

Dean, from Ainsworth Avenue, West Belfast, who had three balaclavas and documents received a nine-month prison term suspended for three years.

Counsel for both men said the offences dated back to September 2016 when police officers raided their homes and there was “no tangible reason” for the delay, described as “huge” in dealing with their case.

With many thanks to: Belfast Live and Michael Donnelly for the original story 

UDA loyalist leader McDonald: I voted Remain

UDA loyalist leader Jackie McDonald has said he voted to remain during the Brexit referendum because he could foresee the future problems it would cause for the Union.

South Belfast UDA loyalist leader Jackie McDonald

Writing in the Loyalist magazine, McDonald said that he had voted to stay in the EU “Because I realised there would be problems with the border issue”. “I believe in democracy and I’ve accepted what the majority of the British public decided and that was to leave,” he said. “I do also believe through that all politicians should have been more open and should have explained exactly what Brexit possibly meant… the discussions and debates that are splitting the electorate now could have and should have taken place before the referendum”, he said. While the DUP and the majority of loyalist spokespeople continue to back Brexit, McDonald, pictured, said the “possible problem for those of us who wished to remain British is that more and more people on the mainland are getting fed up with the border situation here and are seeing it as the only hinderance to a clean break from the European Union”.

Loyalists, including the leadership of a number of paramilitary factions including the UDA and UVF have taken part in a number of meetings across the North of Ireland aimed at resisting the implementation of a sea border in the Brexit withdrawal agreement. However, McDonald, widely believed to be the leader of the South Belfast UDA, has been notably absent from the meetings.

Unionists and Loyalists coming together at the Con Club in East Belfast to discuss the Brexit deal

Writing in the Loyalist newsletter he has urged people to remain calm during the ongoing negotiations. “I believe that our political representatives in Westminster should do their very best to explain to the electorate here in as much detail as possible what the final outcome is going to be. “There won’t be any simple explanations as not everyone will be happy. “We’ve never been in this situation before [and] the MPs in Westminster don’t know themselves what the best way  forward is, so let us all take time to reflect and to listen to those who make those final decisions,” he said.

With many thanks to: The Irish News and Allison Morris Security Correspondent for the original story@a.morris@irishnews.com

 

Loyalist flags with Irish language slogans flown

FLAGS representing a loyalist paramilitary group and inscribed with an Irish language slogan have been flown in a Co Down town.

The Red Hand Commando (RHC) flags appeared on a lamppost in the centre of Ballynahinch. They include the phrase ‘Lamh Derg Abu, a reference to the Irish phrase ‘Lámh dhearg Abú meaning ‘Red Hand to victory’. People in Ballynahinch have spoken of feeling uncomfortable at the sight of the flags, with one telling The Irish News that the paramilitary group “should not be represented in a public place”, close to a library and health clinic.

The RHC, a small loyalist grouping with close links to the UVF, was founded in 1972 and was responsible for 13 murders during the Troubles. Amongst the killings was the 1976 murder – along with the UFF – of former Sinn Féin vice-president Máire Drumm, who was shot dead as she recovered from an eye operation in the Mater Hospital.

In September last year it applied to the British Home Office to be removed from the UK’s list of proscribed terrorist groupings, as part of a bid to become a community organisation. Raymond McCord, whose son Raymond jnr was beaten to death by the UVF in 1997, said the ban should be lifted.

The RHC flags with the Irish language slogan have appeared at several locations across the north in recent years and have also featured on loyalist murals. Sinn Féin north Belfast councillor JJ Magee tweeted: “So no Irish language act, no Irish street signs, no Irish place names but hey Irish language on a Red Hand Commando flag, yes of course #headscratchingmoment”. The introduction of an Irish language act has been a major sticking point to the return of power-sharing at Stormont in negotiations between Sinn Féin and the DUP.

With many thanks to: The Irish News for the original story.

 

 

The corrupt Tory/DUP alliance have tried to sneak this bill through parliament!

TEAM named to consider proposals to protect armed forces veterans from prosecution

This bill is trying to be sneaked through British parliament without the consent of Irish victims

A TEAM has been established in Britain’s Ministry of Defence to consider proposals to protect armed forces veterans from prosecution for historical allegations, the defence secretary has announced.

Gavin Williamson told MPs he understands concerns over whether current and former personnel were receiving the legal protection they deserve (for carrying out murder), amid calls for a statute of limitations.

During defence questions in the commons, Tory former minister Sir Henry Bellingham asked Mr Williamson if he would bring forward legislative proposals for a statute of limitations to protect British armed forces veterans from prosecution for historical allegations (including murder). Mr Williamson replied: “I understand concerns over whether serving and former personel are receiving the legal protection and certainty that they deserve.

” I am therefore pleased to announce that I have established a dedicated team within the Ministry of Defence to consider this issue and advise on the way forward. Defence committee chairman and Conservative MP Julian Lewis said his committee would “warmly welcome the setting up of a dedicated team”.

Chief Constable George Hamilton (pictured above on the right) has previously dismissed claims that legacy investigations are focusing mostly on former members of the security forces rather than paramilitaries. Figures released by the RUC/PSNI last year showed that around 70 per cent of investigations into killings during the Troubles do not involve the security forces.

The announcement came hours before MPs debated the North of Ireland’s Budget (No2) Bill, in which former defence secretary Sir Michael Fallon (pictured below) sought to amend to stop public money being used to fund historical prosecutions of former service personnel in the North of Ireland.

Secretary of State (SoS) Karen Bradley, moving the Bill at second reading, said: “Passing this budget bill does not remove the pressing need to have locally accountable political leaders in place to take the fundamental decisions that will secure a more sustainable future for the people in the North of Ireland.” She said the bill authorises North of Ireland departments and other bodies to incur expenditure of up to £8.9billion and use resources of up to £9.9bn for the financial year ending March 31 2019.

Ms Bradley said it was a “technical” budget bill although she added she was not dismissing the “constitutional significance” of the UK Parliament delivering this to the North of Ireland.

DUP MP Sammy Wilson said: “This is a difficult budget, in cash terms, it’s a flat budget and the amount of money available to government departments in the North of Ireland is no different than it was in the previous year, and that does present challenges.” Mr Wilson added the challenges included allocations being based on decisions taken by the assembly nearly two and a half years ago.

With many thanks to: The Irish News for the original story.