Please Write To Irish Republican Political Prisoners.

This list is updated on a regular basis.

List of Republican prisoners that are looked after by Irish Republican Prisoners Welfare Association (IRPWA)

Portlaoise Gaol

E3 & E4, Dublin Road, Portlaoise, Co Laois

Dublin: Tallaght
Michael Finlay
Dean Byrne
Edward McGrath

Clondalkin

Patrick Brennan

Donard

John Troy

Bluebell

Sean Connolly

Ballymun

Stephen Hendrick

East Wall

Pierce Moran

Rush Co Dublin

John McGrail

Killester

Donal O’Coisdealbha

Goatstown

Connor Hughes

Ballybrack

Darren Fox

Louth:

Owen McCann
Conan Murphy

Carlow:

James Smithers

Cork:

Tony Carroll
Brian Walsh
Joe Walsh
Sean Walsh
Mick Gilmartin
Martin McHale

Derry:

Kevin Devlan

Tyrone:

Damien (DD) McLaughlin

Maghaberry
Roe 4, Maghaberry Prison, Old Road Ballinderry Upper, Lisburn BT28 2PT

Armagh:

Dee Duffy
Shea Reynolds
Ciaran Magee
Brendan McConville
Sean McVeigh
Luke O’ Neill (held on a non-political wing on protest)
John Paul Wotton

Belfast:

Anto Davidson
Christie Robinson

Derry:

Barry Concannon
Jason Ceulmans
Damien Harkin
Neil Hegarty
Nathan Hastings
Seamus McLaughlin

Fermanagh:

Barry Petticrew (Held on a non – political wing in isolation)

Meath:

Darren Poleon
Brian Walsh

Tyrone:

Gavin Coyle
Martin McGilloway (CSU)

Magilligan
Point Rd, Limavady BT49 0LR

Belfast:

Brian Millar

————————————————————————————————

List of Republican prisoners that are looked after by Cogús prisoner support group

Roe House MAGHABERRY

Old Road Ballinderry Upper,
Lisburn,
County Antrim,
BT28 2PT

Conor Hughes

Gerard Flanagan

Carl Reilly

Tony Taylorq

Ta Mc Williams

Ciaran Mc Laughlin

Paddy O’ Neill (teach na failte)

Cogús Prisoners E2, Portlaoise Co Laois:

Charles Anthony Deery

Garret Mulley

Seamus McGrane

Ryan Glennon

With many thanks to: Stephen Codd @ Revolution Ireland.

 

Just a question? Why?

How many people know why Donegall Pass has such a curious name? For whom was St. Anne’s Church named? It was not for Queen Anne. There were five Annes and five Arthurs in the Marquis of Donegall’s family and that explains why these names were so frequently used in Belfast. How many know why there is a King John’s Road in Holywood, and a King William’s Road on the Holywood Hill? Why is there a “Joy” Street in that particularly joyless neighbourhood, or a Fountain Street where no water is now seen?

Why should a road high and dry above the city be called The Falls? We shall find why these things are so in Belfast, and then see what is interesting in the places near us.

The first idea which suggested itself was to take the City Hall as a starting point, and in imagination take a walk along each road leading from it out to the suburbs. This is impossible, for in old times the place where the City Hall stands was surrounded with extensive fields and meadows for grazing, where we now have streets and houses.

We cannot go to the Lisburn Road or the Shore Road when there was no road there, so we must give up that plan and take the places as we can make the best out of them.

Belfast has no very ancient history as we know it in Ireland. Derry, Armagh, Newry, Carrickfergus and Bangor are richer in memories of the olden times, and these neighbouring places are filled with tales of thrilling interest.

Some one has truly said “Happy are the people who have no history,” and we know the best times are the years when nothing particular happens. So our fair city has been spared the bloodshed, the cruelties, and the destructions that were so painfully familiar to some more ancient cities.

It is mentioned in the “Four Masters”—a wonderful old book,—that there was a king’s residence about ten miles from Belfast and a great fort called Rathmore about the year 680. A little while before that time, Bel-Feirste was the scene of a battle which took place on the banks of the Lagan. St. Patrick was very near us when he was in County Down, but we are not told if he ever really came to Belfast.

The next mention of the town comes with the famous John De Courci, who arrived with a small army in the year 1177. He built a great many castles and churches, and lived in regal state in Downpatrick. He is said to have built the first castle in Belfast and a church where the old graveyard of Shankill is now. It was called the “White Church,” and the “Chapel of the Ford ” where St. George’s Church now stands was a minor building.

De Courci was made the first Earl of Ulster, and he built twenty strong fortalices round Strangford Lough, and great castles and churches at Ardglass and Greencastle, Dundrum, Antrim, and Grey Abbey all owe something to his masterful guiding hand. King John next came in 1210. He arrived at Jordan’s Castle in Ardglass on the 12th of July. He visited Dundrum, Downpatrick, and Carrickfergus and crossed the Lough to Holywood on the 29th of July, where the road he passed along is still known by his name. The O’Neills were for one thousand years great warriors in Ulster, and the story of that powerful family would fill volumes. One branch of the clan was intimately connected with Belfast, Clannaboy Clan-Aod-Buide—children of yellow Hugh O’Neill.

The principal stronghold was the Grey Castle, at Castlereagh, which was in existence long before the name of Belfast was on any document, and was once called “The Eagle’s Nest” from its situation and the powerful influence of Conn O’Neill. The coronation stone chair of the O’Neills is now in the Museum in College Square. It was found among the ruins of the Old Castle, and was brought to Belfast in the year 1755, but the chair of state had many adventures. It was built into the wall of the Butter Market. No doubt many a farmer’s wife found it a resting place. Afterwards for some unknown reason it was taken to Sligo. Then it was brought back, and has found a home in the Belfast Museum. King Conn O’Neill has left his name at Connswater and Connsbridge. Many a story is told of him, and his end was very sad. He was imprisoned in Carrickfergus, but he managed to escape to Scotland. In order to save his life he was obliged to transfer his property to Sir James Hamilton and Sir Moses Hill, for he was the owner of 244 townlands. In the year 1606, he gave seven townlands to Sir Hugh Montgomery and seven to Sir Fulke Conway. His vast estates were taken from him, and he died in great poverty in a small house at Ballymenoch near Holywood. All the land as far as the eye could see had once belonged to him, and, at the end of life, he could claim only a grave in the old Church that once stood at Ballymachan.

http://www.libraryireland.com/Belfast-History/Early-History-Belfast.php

http://ancientclanoneill.com/

With many thanks to: Ulster Clans of Ireland.

Standing room only as accused appear

THREE of the most high-profile republicans in the North of Ireland appearing in court together was always going to attract a huge amount of attention and it was standing room only in court 10 at Belfast’s Laganside complex on Tuesday.

988465_571385472938196_1814738100_n

Co Armagh man Colin Duffy was joined in the dock by Harry Fitzsimmons, only recently released from Maghaberry Gaol after serving a sentence for abducting Bobby Tohill in 2004, along with Alec McCrory, a long-serving IRA prisoner and ‘blanket man’. The trio face a series of charges including involvement in a dissident Republican gun attack on police vehicles in North Belfast earlier this month. A Kalashnikov-style weapon was recovered during a follow-up search of the Ardoyne area following the shooting on December 5. The public gallery was packed to capacity with family members and supporters. Several loyalists charged in connection with July 12 violence appeared nervous as charges were put to them with such a large republican audience looking on. Recognisable faces among the supporters were Coalisland man Kevin Barry Murphy, North Belfast republican Brendan Conway and independent councillor Angela Nelson. Dressed casually when brought up from the court’s holding cells to the dock, the three accused remained impassive throughout the short hearing. They refused to stand while charges were read out and refused to answer when they were put to them. A detective said he could connect the accused to the offences. The men’s solicitors said they would not be applying for bail at this time. The hearing lasted less than five minutes, and as the three were taken back into custody supporters in the public gallery clapped and cheered. Magistrate Fiona Bagnall ordered the court be cleared. There was a heavy police presence outside the courthouse as the  three were taken from the court to Maghaberry Gaol in a blacked-out prison van.

With many thanks to: Allison Morris, The Irish News

Colin Duffy

1487773_10202828899547580_1174360318_o

Arguably the most recognisable face of anti-agreement republicanism, the Co Armagh man was acquitted in January 2012 of the murder of two British soldiers at Massereene army base in Co Antrim in 2009, having served a lengthy period on remand. In 1993 he was convicted of the PIRA murder of UDA man John Lyness but was acquitted on appeal. The 47-year-old was also detained followng the IRA murders of constable David Johnson and John Graham in Lurgan in June 1997, shortly before the second IRA ceasefire but the charges were dropped due to insufficient evidence. In November last year he was arrested by detectives investigating the murder of prison officer David Black but was released without charge. His most recent arrest was in May of this year when he was qustioned about dissident republican activity before being released unconditionally. Once the most senior member of Shame Fein in the Lurgan area the hard line republican left the party prior to the decision to endorse policing. He was briefly a member of eirigi, but left the party shortly before his arrest for the Massereene attack.

Alec McCrory

1528541_558100217611797_940118929_n

The West Belfast man served two periods of imprisonment for the Provisional IRA. He was one of the youngest prisoners to join the blanket protest after being jailed in 1978 at the age of 17. He was imprisoned for a second time in the 1980s and served 14 years for possession of a bomb. In 2011 he was the first person in the North of Ireland to make an offcial complaint to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal over what he claimed were repeated attempts by MI5 to recruit him as an agent. More recently he has acted as a spokesman for republican prisoners held in Maghaberry.

Harry Fitzsimmons

1486009_656499887726775_33794801_o

HE was released from prison in May of this year after serving a jail term for the abduction of dissident Bobby Tohill in 2004 from a Belfast city centre bar. Tohill was rescued by police who rammed the van he was being carried in, he later refused to give evidence against his abductors. The event nearly jeopardized the Peace Process as the Provos were on ceasefire at the time. Fitzsimmons and his co accused went on the run in 2006 while awaiting sentencing, he was extradited to the North after being arrested in Dundalk in November 2009. While in Maghaberry he spent most of his sentence on protest against the prison regime. He was arrested last month and questioned about the murder of drug dealer Kevin Kearney but was released without charge. Since being released he had been living in North Belfast, however, after receiving death threats his address was given on Tuesday as of ‘no fixed abode’.

Thwarted mortar attack ‘targeted security forces’ !!!

Court told of recon against police and prison officers

A MORTAR-BOMB attack was being planned on a security force vehicle in Co Armagh, the High Court heard yesterday.

DENIED BAIL: Damien Duffy

Prosecutors said reconnaissance was used against police and prison staff, including a governer, over a two-year period. Suspects drove past one target’s home more than 50 times in eight days, a judge was told. Details emerged as one of three men accused of a plot to bomb and killwas refused bal. Damien Duffy (43), of Campbell Walk in Lurgan, Co Armagh, is charged with conspiracy to murder, conspiring to cause an explosion and collecting iformation likely to be used to terrorists. He was arrested in May last year after a nine-month police iinvestigation involving surveillance, tracking and covert recordings. The alleged offences, stretching back to November 2009, relate to police and prison officers ‘ movements in the Lurgan and Craigavon areas, their addresses and routes taken to and from work. A prosecution barrister said audio recordings showed the Kilmore Road and Cottage Road junction in Lurgan was to be used for a mortar-bomb attack on security forces. The location is on a route regularly used by police and prison staff, the court heard. Alleged discussions between the suspects including references to lines of sight, getting angles right and breaking cover. The barrister said attack planning was carried out on two identified prison officers as they came and went to Maghaberry Prison in Co Antrim.

Lord Justice Coghlin was told that the governor’s home in a rural setting  was passed several times for no apparent legitimate reason. The barrister said two of the accused scouted one officer’s home on 54 occasions – including 21 times in a 90-minute period. According to police, anti surveillance techniques and U-turns were performed. Discussions about the areas for carrying out an attack, escape routes and “giving it 20 seconds to get down there” were recorded, the court heard. It was accepted that forensic analysis of the audio recordings was unable to attribute any of the remarks to Duffy. However, the court was told independent witnesses said he had been in the car used during the alleged offences. Mark Mulholland QC, defending, said Duffy should be released due to the “paucity” of evidence and delays in processing the case. “The starting point is what can be aattributed to this accused and at no time is there any express reference to targeting, weaponry or anything of that nature,” he said. “What appears to be a case grounded principally on what can be inferred or speculated was at hand does not pass muster. “In the period of time the accused was under surveillance, whatever was being suggested by the prosecution absolutely nothing happened.” Lord Justice Coghlin said an explanation would eventually have to be given. Separating terrorist offences from other crimes, he said: “It’s nothing whatever to do with the political beliefs of those charged. “It’s to do with a very small group of people who are not prepared to take part in a democracy but wish to achieve what they beleive to be some firm of political end by killing and injuring people. “In cases of terrorism the offence is driven by a warped political ideology. Therefore there is a significantly higher risk of further offences.”

With many thanks to : The Irish News.

Related articles

TRIBUTES TO MOTHER OF THREE SON’S MASSACRED BY LOYALISTS

‘ The one thing she insisted on was that nobody would try to take revenge for the loss of her sons – Eugene Reavey

kr

A SOUTH Armagh woman whose three sons were shot dead by loyalists during the Troubles has been described as an “inspiration” after she passed away eearlier this week. Sadie Reavey died peacefully in Daisy Hill hospital overnight on Monday surrounded by members of her family.

Three of Mrs Reavey’s sons, John (24),  Brian (22) and Anthony (17), died after being shot by loyalists during an ambush on their White cross home in 1976. The murders were committed by the notorious loyalist the Glenanne Gang, which included members of the UVF, UDR and RUC. No-one has ever been charged in connection with the murders. Mrs Reavey suffered more heartache when her husband Jimmy died prematurely in 1981. There was yet more tragedy for the south Armagh woman in 1994 when her daughter Una McKenna died after losing a battle with cancer aged just 31. Mrs Reavey’s son Eugene last night said his mother always carried her grief with dignity. “She was a very strong person and a lot of people got a lot of inspiration from her over the years,” he said. “The one thing she insisted on was that nobody would try to take revenge for the loss of her sons.” Mr Reavey described his mother as a “descent woman” who was “well thought of” by neighbours and friends.

“Her life was a life well lived. She had a very strong faith and she would have prayed all day and all night,” he said. “That’s what got her through all those bad times.”She went to help other people to deal with her own ccommunity.” Former deputy first minister Seamus Mall on knew Mrs Reavey for many years. “She was a remarkably fine woman who withstood the agony of the murder of her three sons,” he said. “She always showed dignity and herself and her husband Jimmy were an example to the entire community in the way in which they dealt with the murder of their three sons.” Mr MMall on said Mrs Reavey was an example to others. “She was a tolerant woman and a person in the community that people admired respected and loved.” Earlier this year Mrs Reavey was visited in her home by shadow secretary of state Vernon Croaker. Mr Croaker also meet 90-year-old Mary O’Hare, whose daughter MA Ella was shot dead by British soldiers near Whitecross as she made her way to church in 1976. After the meeting Mr Croaker said both woman had handled their “grief with great dignity and compassion”. Requiem Mass for Mrs Reavey will be celebrated at St Brigids‘s Church, Whitecross, at 11am tommorow.

With many thanks to : Connla Young, The Irish News.

REPATRIATE MICHAEL CAMPBELL

1044170_1390295744519286_789359173_n

Cumann Sean MacEachaidh

The Repatriate Michael Campbell Campaign.

1st July 2013.

Organised and mobilized. (Ard Mhacha Abú)

Armagh’s emphatic 2-21 – 0-02 victory over Wicklow at the Counties Athletic Grounds yesterday was not the only locally cultivated success in the city to be lauded.

Up to 30 members of The Repatriate Michael Campbell Campaign exploited the influx of GAA supporters and media personnel in to Armagh and staged a picket and information point highlighting the denials of Michael Campbell’s human rights, rights as an Irish Citizen and his right to come home and to serve his sentence on Irish Soil.

Over 3000 leaflets were distributed to an extremely responsive crowd and the campaign group were inundated with requests from both sets of supporters and neutrals, for further information and contact points for the future.

Local MLA’s Councillors and MP’s attending the game accepted leaflets from the group who covered all entry points to the stadium. All those who we interacted with, were respectful and courteous and when implored to consider the campaign most, if not all, committed to do so.

Today saw cohesion succeed with activists from all over county Armagh connecting and it is these efforts that will prove most successful in the weeks to come. We cannot thank all of those who helped out today enough.

It must be remembered, not diminishing Armagh’s victory, that this was a Qualifier and not billed as a Major Championship game, however the response was magnificent and we can now expect even greater things to follow on our next outing, so join in and become a part of this campaign as it rolls out.

The official campaign leaflet text is available to copy and paste on this page, or the actual leaflet and generic posters are available and can be printed from here.

This is a good cause and it will result in a victory for Human Rights. Share in that victory. Bring Michael Campbell Home!! (12 photos)

FRAZER IS FREED AGAIN AFTER AFTER SECOND BAIL BREACH HEARING !

‘ The defendent raised his voice again referring to an officer a southerner and a Provo – PSNI witness.

945240_519690814746090_673885910_n-1

LOYALIST campaigner Willie Frazer was freed again on Tuesday despite being held to have breached bail terms and labelling an arresting officer “a Provo“. A judge released the 53-year-old with a warning that he cannot continue to flout conditions imposed on him.

Frazer, from Markethill, Co Armagh, was arrested on Monday night following a protest against plans to build a peace centre at the site of the former Maze prison. He is currently on bail charged with encouraging offences by an address the Union Flag demonstrarors in January. Frazer is also accused of three counts of taking part in an unnotified public procession, obstructing traffic in a public place, and possession of a prohibited weapon, namely a Taser stun-gun. In March he was granted bail on a series of tight conditions. They included an order not to make any public speeches or social media comments connected to the flag dispute, or being within two miles of public protests, demonstrations or processions. Police detailed three incidents in the last week which culminated in him being arrested on the motorway near Craigavon and taken into custody.

Belfast Magistrates Court heard he was first seen in a car in Tandragee on June 13 about half a mile from where a small group of Union Flag protesters had gathered. After being spoken to by an officer he produced a recording device and asked him to repeat what he had said, according to police. A day later he was spotted driving in Rathfriland where a loyalist band parade was being held. Frazer was eventually detained following a protest at the site of the former Maze Prison on Monday. Five people were there to protest against plans to build a peace centre at the location. Union Flags and a placard stating “terrorist shrine” were observed at the scene, the court heard. Frazer was arrested more than 10 miles away, allegedly refusing at first to get out of his car. A struggle began after handcuffs were used, with two officers needed to remove him from the vehicle. A constable told the court : “The defendant raised his voice and began referring to an officer as a southerner and a Provo.” Maze protest leaflets and a camcorder were seized from the car.

As Frazer’s wife Ann joined other supporters in the public gallery, defence counsel Richard Smyth said none of the alleged bail breaches were accepted. He said his client had chanced upon the first protest and band parade while out in his car. Frazer had then arranged to meet a journalist at the Maze half an hour before a planned demonstration by others to ensure he did not flout release conditions, the barrister contended. “When he was finishing off the interveiw two or three cars pulled up, he says six people got out, there was brief pleasantries exchanged and then got in his car and left,” Mr Smyth added. District Judge George Conner observed that the campaigner seemed to be attracted to protests either “telepathically or otherwise”. Although Frazer was held to be in breach of his release conditions, Mr Conner ruled he could be granted bail again. The judge warned : “He must realise he cannot continue to flout the posititon, which is what I think is going on.”

With thanks to : Irish News.