Remembering Mick Hogan, murdered by the Black n Tans, on 1st Bloody Sunday, November 21st 1920 at Croke Park.

Mick Hogan, murdered by the Black n Tans, GAA, Hogan Stand, Bloody Sunday, Croke Park, Dublin, 21st November 1920,

Mick Hogan, murdered by the Black n Tans, November 21st 1920, at Croke Park, photo credit: Marcas Mac Giolla Aindreis.
Photo credits to: Marcas Mac Giolla Aindreis
Photo credits to: Marcas Mac Giolla Aindreis

Tipperray footballer and IRA man Mick Hogan who was murdered by the Black n Tans on November 21 1920 at Croke park during a challenge match between Dublin and Tipp, the black bastards burst in to Croke park and shot 14 unarmed civilians, the atrocity was named Bloody Sunday.

Photo credits to: Marcas Mac Giolla Aindreis

With many thanks to: Marcas Mac Giolla Aindreis – Chaírde ar an Arm Náisiúnta Fuascailte na hÉireann.

Guildford Four’s Armstrong lays bare experience of prison and it’s aftermath.

ONE of the Guildford Four has described his struggles following his release from prison – and how he has come out the other side. Wrongly convicted and imprisoned for 15 years, Paddy Armstrong was one of four people (known as the Guildford Four), jailed for the Guildford pub bombings in England in 1975.



Almost 30 years after his release, the Belfast-born man has relieved his ordeal in a book, Life After Life, saying “we can’t let people forget, because there are still injustices in the world today”. Mr Armstrong said the book, ghostwritten by Journalist Mary-Elaine Tynan, “lays bare the experiences of those years and their aftermath”. “It took a year and a half to get this out of me, but I’m glad I’ve done It,” he told The Irish News. “My son and daughter had begun asking questions about what happened to me and I found it difficult to answer. “I live for my family and I want people to see I’ve come out the other side – that there is a life after life.”



Mr Armstrong was jailed for life alongside Gerry Conlon, Paul Hill and Carole Richardson in what was widely regarded as one of the UK’s worst miscarriages of justice.

I needed to do it for my children and their generation – people who don’t know our story. Because their are still injustices in the world today. – Paddy Armstrong.


Their convictions for murdering five people in two IRA pub bombings in 1974 were finally quashed by the Court of Appeal in 1989. Recalling a dark period of his life, Mr Armstrong said: “I didn’t have a clue what was going on when I was arrested.


“They asked me the same questions over and over again. One of the police said: “We know you didn’t do it but we’re going to do you for it”. When we were told we would serve 35 years. I thought I’d never see the outside world again. “But that time came and when I got out I lived with my solicitor Alistair Logan for nine months – he saved me as I didn’t know anything about the outside. I remember the first night I stayed in his house I ended up putting the mattress onto the floor as I wasn’t used to sleeping on a bed.


“That following morning, Alistair said to me: ‘I heard you moving about a lot in your room’ and I said I still had in my head the warders were coming into my cell. “He got two doctors to treat me – ones that help soldiers who came from war, and I think that helped get my head together. They helped me adjust to life outside again. “It was very hard and there were times I wanted to be back in prison because at least I knew the structure there.”


“Asked if his ordeal had made him bitter, Mr Armstrong said: “I’ve no bitterness at all, I’m not that type of guy. “I’m angry with the police. I always get asked ‘you must hate so many people’ but what’s the point?” On why he was publishing his memoirs now, he said: “I didn’t just want the book to be about my time in prison but also about my life since I got out, and how difficult it was in those early days. 

“I needed to do it for my children and the people of their generation – people who don’t know our story. Gerry Conlon and Carole Richardson are gone now, but I’m still here. And so is Paul Hill. “And we can’t let people forget because there are still injustices in the world today.” Life After Life, A Guildford Four memoir will be launched at Easons in Belfast’s Donegal Place at 6.30pm on Thursday night April 13th 2017.
#JFTC2 #JusticeForTheCraigavonTwo

#FreeTonyTaylor

With many thanks to: Suzanne McGonagle, The Irish News.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guildford_Four_and_Maguire_Seven

Loughgall Martyrs 30th Anniversary.

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Loughgall ambush when 9 Irishmen were killed by British Crown Forces. Volunteers Declan Arthurs, Seamus Donnelly, Tony Gormley, Eugene Kelly, Paddy Kelly, Jim Lynagh, Padraig McKearney and Gerard O’Callaghan were members of the East Tyrone Brigade IRA. Civilian Anthony Hughes was also killed that evening. The attack was part of a British murder campaign in East Tyrone/North Armagh in the late 1980’s/early 1990’s when the full might of the British war machine including SAS, British Army, RUC, UVF, UDR were unleashed on the people of East Tyrone. 
These nine men were husbands, fathers, sons and brothers to their loved ones whose only crime was that they were Irish in British Occupied Ireland. They were killed by faceless, nameless paid SAS assassins who were in Ireland to carry out Britain’s war of terror against the democratic rights of the Irish people. 

The main commemoration this year is the Independent Republican March and Commemoration on Sunday 7th May assembling at Galbally Community Centre at 3pm organised by the P.H. Pearse Society Galbally/Cappagh. The event is non-party political and everyone is welcome.

Sunday 23rd April @2pm 5 mile Sponsored walk, Assemble Republican Monument Aughnagar Chapel.

The James Connolly 1916 Society Monaghan will be holding a day of events to mark the 30th Anniversary of The Loughall Massacre. This will be in conjuction with other independent republican commemorations in Tyrone and Monaghan. On Sunday April 30th we will embark on a sponsored walk from the Jim lynagh, Padraig Mc Kearney Loughall monument in Drumfurrer, Carrickroe co Monaghan to the Seamus mc Elwaine monument Knockatallen, Scotstown, Co Monaghan. A short lecture will take place after the walk in the Sliabh beagh hotel with refreshments served . That night we will be hosting a social night in Moynas bar Scotstown @9. A Prominent speaker will be in attendance on the night. 

The annual mass organised by the families will be on Friday 5th May in Altmore at 7.30pm with refreshments afterwards in Galbally Community Centre. 

There will be a Tour of the Graves assisted by local 1916 Societies on Sat 6th May starting at 10.30am in Altmore and continuing on then to Galbally, Aughnagar, Monaghan, Caledon, Tullysarron, Moy and finishing at Edendork. 

On Sunday 7th May the main commemoration and march assembles at Galbally Community Centre at 3pm and will make its way to Cappagh. 

This commemoration gives all Republicans, young and old, a chance to remember these fine Irishmen who died thirty years ago that evening in Loughgall. Their story is one that the people of Ireland will always remember with sadness, anger, love and pride.

With  many thanks to: PH Pearse Galbally Cappagh.

List of Events to Commemorate the 30th Anniversary of the Loughgall Ambush.


Sunday 23rd April   – 5 mile Sponsored walk @ 2pm 
Assemble Republican Monument Aughnagar Chapel.
 
On Sunday April 30th – a sponsored walk from The Jim Lynagh, Padraig Mc Kearney Loughgall Monument in Drumfurrer, Carrickroe Co. Monaghan to The Seamus Mc Elwaine Monument Knockatallon, Scotstown, Co Monaghan. The walk is 9k. Sponsorship cards are available or a Ten Euro entry fee on the day. Assemble at The Sliabh beagh hotel @12noon where transport will be available to The Jim Lynagh Padraig Mc Kearney Loughgall Monument in Drumfurrer. Also a short lecture will take place after the walk in the Sliabh Beagh Hotel with refreshments served. That night a social night in Moyna’s bar Scotstown @9 pm with the band Black Diamond, admission is free and a raffle will take place on the night.
 
Sunday 30th April Commemorative parade. Assemble Altmore Chapel car park @ 6pm & parade to memorial in Cappagh. 
Wednesday 3rd May. Loughgall martyrs memorial lecture in Old Charm Inn Carrickmore @ 8pm.
 

 

 Friday 5th May     –     The Anniversary Mass in Altmore @ 7.30pm  

 

 

Saturday 6th May – Tour of the Graves Route is as follows

 

Altmore 10.30am, Galbally 11am; Aughnagar 11.30am; Monaghan 12.30pm; Caledon 1.30pm; Tullysarron 2.30pm; Moy 3.15pm; Edendork 4pm 

 
 
Sunday 7th May – Commemoration at Padraig and Jim’s monument at Drumfurrer at 1pm
 
Sunday 7th May – March to Cappagh Memorial – assemble at Galbally Community Centre @3pm
 
Monday 8th May – Commemoration PM for details 
 
Sat 13th May – Loughgall martyrs memorial walk in Sperrin Mountains.

With many thanks to: Maireadp Kelly.

Submission to the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights, Nils Muižniks, concerning the shooting dead of sisters Dorothy Maguire & Maura Meehan by British Soldiers, October 23rd 1971, West Belfast.

A follow-up to a previous story concerning the murder of Maura Meehan and her sister who were murdered by the British Army: 

With many thanks to: Geard Meehan, Meehan and Maguire family’s, https://www.facebook.com/groups/174928556038780/.

The EIRC Fermanagh would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who took part in making it yet another successful commemoration and function.

We would like thank Eamon Farry for chairing the proceedings and Fermanagh Republican and ex P.O.W Barry Murray for speaking not only of our fallen republicans or modern day republicanism but also of the social change that will effect our everyday lives in the not so long future. 

We would like to thank the band Gary Lawlor and the rebels for what can only be described as an outstanding night enjoyed by all. And last but not least we would like to thank everybody that came to both events as we very much appreciate your support.

With many thanks to: EIRC Fermanagh.

Only a child…….murdered by the brave British Army. No-one charged….. No-one convicted 

These British Soldiers marched on the streets of Belfast protesting at not being treated fairly in the North of Ireland. They are afraid to face their own British Court system because they know they will be found “Guilty As charged” for murder & Treason…….

The British Army veterans triumphantly celebrated because they were allowed to march in Belfast.


But back in 1982 on the 16th April one of the victims of the Trouble’s: A Child of 11 summers was murdered by these brave British Soldiers – Shot dead by the British Army on the streets of Belfast.

Stephen Mc Conomy was murdered by the brave British Army on 16th April 1982. He was only a child of 11-years-old.
This is how they left him, shot in the head with plastic bullets. Left fighting for his life but found to be brain dead. He died in a short time later.
This is a picture of the plastic bullet that was fired at the 11-year-old. By the Brave British Soldiers.
A plaque erected in his memory to remember young Stephen Mc Conomy. Murdered by British Soldiers.
Stephen Mc Conomy murdered 16th April 1982.

With many thanks to: Gary Donnelly.