Bloody Sunday families demand case to be kept in Co. Derry

Brother says ‘Soldier F’ hearing should not be moved!

Bloody Sunday not forgotten your Poppy here for us means nothing

The Bloody Sunday families will fight “tooth and nail” to prevent the Soldier F murder case being moved out of Derry. Michael McKinney, whose brother, William was among those gunned down in cold blood by British Paratroopers said his family would not allow his brothers murder to be treated differently than any other victim. Mr McKinney (pictured below) was speaking after District Judge Barney McElholm suggested the case be moved to Belfast to ensure a suitable venue was available.

PLEDGE: Michael McKinney said his family will fight ‘tooth and nail’ to keep the ‘Soldier F’ case in Derry

Soldier F is facing two murder charges in connection with the 1972 murders of 13 innocent victims on Bloody Sunday.

“We as a family will not let Willie be treated differently from any other victim” – Michael McKinney 

The former British Paratrooper is to be charged with the murder of William McKinney and Jim Wray (both pictured in the featured image) as well as four counts of attempted murder. He denies the charges. At a preliminary hearing in Co Derry yesterday – at which ‘Soldier F’ was not present – a Public Prosecution lawyer said a decision must be taken on a venue for the case in the near future. Judge McElholm said it looked likely that the case would have to be moved out of Derry. “We cannot convene this in just some hall or public space. There are considerations of security,” he said. “We are willing to listen to any opposition put to us. “At the moment, despite trying to get somewhere closer to the city, I am afraid Belfast looks like the venue.” Solicitor for the Bloody Sunday families, Ciaran Shiels, said the case should be heard in Derry.

SUNDAY BLOODY SUNDAY THE VICTIMS MURDERED IN 1972 WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN R.I.P

“This is where the killings occurred, a stone’s throw from these buildings,” he said. “We have always been of the view that ‘F’ should be attending here in person at his committal and that remains the position.” He said other arrangements could be made to overcome any logistical challenges while, in security terms, police favoured Derry over Belfast.

A very rare photograph of ‘Soldier F’ which was taken in Co Derry in 1972

His comments were echoed by Mr McKinney, who said the Bloody Sunday families were determined that ‘Soldier F’ should stand trial in Derry. “My brother was an innocent young Derry man who was shot dead on the streets of his hometown and now there are moves to take the trial out of Derry,” he said. “We’ll fight tooth and nail to keep this case in Derry.”

Follow this link to find out more in 1971 11 people were murdered in Ballymurphy  by by the same British Army regiment who murdered 13 innocent people on Bloody Sunday in Derry: https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2295906417095915&id=100000297382246

The families are also opposing moves to continue anonymity for ‘Soldier F’. Mr Shiels said he been informed that if ‘Soldier F’ wished to maintain his anonymity, his lawyers should set out in detail the legal provision on which they rely.

Ballymurphy 1971 British State Murder For Hire

The Bloody Sunday families have two weeks to make submissions challenging the decision to move the hearings to Belfast. The case has been adjourned until February 7th 2020.

With many thanks to: The Irish News and Seamus McKinney for the original story 

Bloody Sunday 1920 in Croke Park – 90 seconds of shooting that changed Irish-British History

https://www.the42.ie/bloody-sunday-1920-1767626-Nov2014/

McDonald’s apologies for ‘Sundae Bloody Sundae’ advert All promotional material has been removed

(Image: Getty Images)

McDonald’s has issued an apology for a Halloween advert running in their Portugal stores using the slogan ‘Sundae Bloody Sundae’.

The poster which has caused outrage on social media was posted by a customer who spotted it in one of the fast-food outlets branches in Portgual.

Posting a photo of the advert on Twitter, the customer captioned the picture: “Portugal is cancelled.”

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Thirteen people were killed and 15 people wounded after members of the British Army’s Parachute Regiment opened fire on civil rights demonstrators in the Bogside area of Derry on Sunday 30 January 1972.

The day became known as ‘Bloody Sunday’, one the darkest days of The Troubles in NI.

A spokeswoman for McDonald’s said: “When promoting its Halloween Sundae ice cream, McDonald’s Portugal developed a local market activation for a small number of its restaurants in Portugal.

“The campaign was intended as a celebration of Halloween, not as an insensitive reference to any historical event or to upset or insult anyone in any way.

“We sincerely apologise for any offence or distress this may have caused. All promotional material has been removed from restaurants.”

With many thanks to: Belfast Live and Sheena McStravik for the original story 

Family of man shot dead on Bloody Sunday to receive £300k compensation

https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/family-of-man-shot-dead-on-bloody-sunday-to-receive-300k-compensation-38517637.html

August court date set for British Army Paratropper double murder trail on Bloody Sunday

Soldier F’ faces charges for the murders of James Wray and William McKinney

A motorcyclist at a rally in London supported by British Army Veterans last April criticising the prosecution of Soldier F. Photograph: Niklas Halle’n/AFP/Getty Images

A motorcyclist at a rally in London supported by British army veterans last April criticising the prosecution of Soldier F. Photograph: Niklas Halle’n/AFP/Getty Images

A former British army paratrooper facing prosecution for two murders and four attempted murders on Bloody Sunday is expected to appear in court in Derry in August.

The Army veteran — a former lance corporal in the Parachute Regiment known only as Soldier F — faces charges for the murders of James Wray and William McKinney in Derry in 1972.

He also faces charges for the attempted murders of Joseph Friel, Michael Quinn, Joe Mahon and Patrick O’Donnell.

Relatives have been informed by Northern Ireland’s Public Prosecution Service (PPS) that it is anticipated that Soldier F will make his first court appearance on a date in August at the magistrates’ court in Derry.

A PPS spokeswoman said: “Significant progress has been made on the process of preparing the large volume of court papers required before a summons can issue to Soldier F.

“While this complex process is at an advanced stage, the public prosecution service has had to request some further material from police before the necessary papers can be finalised.

“Based on the estimated time required for this material to be provided, the prosecution team expects to be in a position to issue a summons to the defendant next month.

“It is therefore envisaged at this stage that Soldier F will make his first court appearance on a date in August, at Londonderry Magistrates’ Court.

“In line with our commitment to keep the families informed of all developments, the PPS wrote to those involved last week with this latest timetable.”

Ciaran Shiels, from Madden & Finucane solicitors — which represents Bloody Sunday families, said: “We have requested a timetable in relation to the prosecutions and we had previously made submissions that Soldier F should face criminal proceedings in Derry as it was in this city where the crimes we say he committed took place.”

Thirteen civil rights demonstrators were shot dead on January 30th 1972, on one of the most notorious days of the Northern Ireland Troubles.

Bloody Sunday families vowed to continue their campaign for justice after it was announced in March that only one former paratrooper — Soldier F — is to be prosecuted over the shootings.

Relatives of those who died reacted with a mix of vindication, disappointment and defiance.

As well as the 13 who died on the day, 15 others were shot and injured.

One of the injured died months later from an inoperable tumour and some consider him the 14th fatality.

Prosecutors had been considering evidence in relation to potential counts of murder, attempted murder and causing grievous injury with intent.

Murdering Bastards

A murder investigation by the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) followed the £195 million inquiry and files on 18 soldiers were submitted to prosecutors in 2016 and 2017 for consideration.

Butchers Apron

One has since died. Four other soldiers included in the Saville Report died before police had completed their investigation.

Papers before prosecutors included 668 witness statements and numerous photos, video and audio evidence. – PA

With many thanks to: The Irish Times for the original story