In memory of I.R.A Volunteer Joseph O’ Connor. Executed this day in 2000 by the British agents of the British Crown in collaboration with the Provisional Republican movement.

In memory of Oglach Joe O’Connor

R.I.P comrade #TAL

As now exposed British agents helped establish the Good Friday Surrender, many Republicans stood resolutely opposed, realising what we know as fact today, that it would not eradicate sectarianism, it would not remove British rule and it would therefore not lead to a Socialist Republic.

To oppose this the 32 County Sovereignty Movement was formed. Around this time, the Irish Republican Army also reformed as the Provisional movement was now in direct contradiction of its own aims. Instead, the provisional movement began to carry out the wishes of the British establishment by trying to silence Republicans by any means. To carry out what then British Secretary of State Mo Mowlam refereed to as “internal house keeping”.

However, there was one young, idealistic and fearsome I.R.A Volunteer these agents of British rule could not silence or intimidate. Joseph O’ Connor publicly challenged these alley rats and stoops of British rule.

After leaving his mothers house on the 13th October 2000, two of these agents approached I.R.A Volunteer Joseph O’ Connor and shot him dead.

To further the aims of British intelligence they also tried to plant the weapon near the office of another Republican organisation to stoke division. The old British mantra of divide and conquer was not lost on these agents. However, a local republican spotted these agents and realised their intent.

Joseph is forever remembered by his comrades throughout Ireland who like him, have never and will never accept any false right of Britain to remain in Ireland.

R.I.P Oglach Joseph O’ Connor, Belfast Brigade, Irish Republican Army.

Beir Bua!

With many thanks to the: 32 County Sovereignty Movement Co Cork and McKelvey Steele Cumann (RSF) for the original postings.

Remembering life-long republican and patron of Republican Sinn Féin, Dan Keating who passed on the 2nd of October

Dan Keating was born on the 2nd January in Castlemaine, Co Kerry. He received his education in local schools, including the Christian Brothers School in Tralee, where he did his apprenticeship. During this time he became a skillful Gaelic football player in his native Kerry.

Dan was born on the 2nd January 1902 in Castlemaine, Co Kerry into a family steeped in National revolutionary freedom fighter’s dating right back to the great genocide. Through family Dan was taught the importance of nationhood, Irish, gaelic and revolutionary culture and history. It’s here Dan’s political leanings stemmed from, several of his uncles were militant freedom fighter’s in the land agitation years following the great hunger. In two interviews for a Radio Ulster documentary on his life, Keating recalled how his past shaped his future. ‘One branch of the family was very militant. At the time land-grabbing was rampant in Ireland. You had an agent in Milltown called Leslie, and Lord Mounteagle was the landlord. You could be doing well today and a couple days later they would raise the rent to something you couldn’t meet and they would put another fellow into it and you got the road. That brought the Moonlighters and it must be said, the Moonlighters did a great job. In every generation you had people willing to fight. . . the Moonlighters, the United Irishmen, then onto Sinn Féin and the IRB. You could say they were the soul of Ireland at the time.’

He was 14y old when the 1916 Easter rising took place, the 1916 rebellion and the gallantry of the rebel leaders was to have a great influence on Dan. He joined Fianna Éireann in 1918. In 1920, during the Irish War of Independence, he joined the 3rd Battalion, 1st Kerry Brigade, of the Irish Republican Army. He was an active volunteer brave and daring. On the 21st of April 1921, an RIC Constable Denis O’Loughlin was shot dead in Knightly’s public house in Tralee. Keating, Jimmy O’Connor and Percy Hanafin were suspected of the killing, and were forced to go on the run. On the 1st of June, Keating was involved in an ambush between Castlemaine and Milltown which saw five members of the crown forces disposed off. Dan’s unit was involved in a gun battle with the British Army near Castleisland which resulted in the deaths of four British soldiers and five IRA volunteers. Tralee co. Kerry became a stronghold for the IRA, militant nd, supportive
Dan Keating opposed the sellout 1921 Anglo-Irish Treaty and remained principled and faithful to Republicanism, going on to fight on the anti-treaty side in the Irish Civil War. He was involved in operations in Kerry, Limerick, and Tipperary, before his column was arrested by Free State Forces. Keating spent seven months in Portlaoise Prison and the Curragh concentration camp before being released in March 1923. He remained committed to the Republican cause and a dedicated IRA volunteer for a long time after the Civil War. He was arrested several times during the 1930s on various charges. He was active in London during the 1939/1940 IRA bombing campaign.
In 1933, he was involved in an attempt to assassinate the leader of the Irish Blueshirts, Eoin O’Duffy, during a visit to County Kerry. The attack was to happen at Ballyseedy, where Free State forces had carried out the Ballyseedy Massacre during the Irish Civil War. However, the plot failed when the person travelling with O’Duffy refused to divulge what car the latter would be travelling in.
Dan returned to Dublin and worked as a barman in several public houses. He later returned to his native Kerry in 1978, living out the rest of his life with relatives in Knockbrack. Until his death he refused to accept a state pension because he considered the 26-county Republic of Ireland an illegitimate state which usurped the 1916 Irish Republic.

Tralee co. Kerry became a stronghold for the IRA. When there was some British soldiers shot one November night they decided to have this curfew. You had some very bitter policemen in Tralee also.’ Keating had begun working in Gerry McSeeley’s bar and bakery in Castle Street in Tralee, as an apprentice barman. ‘The first year you got no money, but you were well fed, before rising to a pound a week in the third year.’ His involvement in republicanism came not from lengthy historical or political study but from being swept away in the fervour of the time. He said there was no relevant history taught in schools, and that he and others were simply reacting to events and following each other into the ranks of the IRA. ‘It was the thing to do at the time—there was a wave and you got caught up in that.’ He was too young to join the IRA and joined the youth wing, Fianna Éireann, instead, providing information, from the vantage point of the bar or from elsewhere.
Graduating to the ranks of the IRA, Keating took part in several ambushes and continued intelligence-gathering. Tralee and the surrounding area was by then the scene of serious fighting between the IRA and the Crown forces, including Irishmen in the RIC, several of whom were shot by the local IRA. Under suspicion for one such killing, Keating went on the run but said that he and others in the IRA melted into the local population, who gave them full support. ‘They were great, the local people at the time, they were the soul of Ireland. Without the local people, the Flying Columns couldn’t exist. They’d [the police] get no response from the people. The people were opposed to them at the time, and it continued that way right up to the Truce.’
Rather than boasting about his involvement, Keating said that it was no more than what his contemporaries did. He did not know if he had killed but said that the prospect did not trouble him. Recorded by the BBC in March 2007, he said: ‘When you are involved in an ambush with a crowd of men you wouldn’t know who killed who or what about it. It never troubled me. You were fighting for a just cause and once you have that in the forefront it never troubled you. It never troubled me—it was a job to be done and at the time it was a just cause. And the more that was killed the better you liked it. Everyone was delighted about Kilmichael and other big ones in Cork.’
The largest operation he was involved in was an ambush in Castlemaine. Keating knew of a regular bicycle convoy of Crown forces through the village, and he sought assistance from outside for a major attack. ‘At the outset in Castlemaine there were only two riflemen and about twenty shotgun men, completely inadequate. In the course of the day, some came from Beaufort and one from Farranfore, and there were twelve men who came and they were based in a hut in Keel. Fourteen policemen left Killorglin to go to Tralee to draw the month’s wages. They were in different file, about 30 or 40 yards before every man going. They went and collected their wages anyway and they had a few drinks on the way home, they went into the pubs in Castlemaine—it must be said the publicans were great, no hint in the world [of the ambush plan]. When they went across the bridge at Brackhill Cross they were intercepted, there were eight of them killed, and there was one [unscathed] survivor anyway. He was left to look after the injured.’
He spoke ruefully of a final attack launched in the last hours before the Truce. Hatred of the Black and Tans, RIC and Auxiliaries was such that one final assault was launched, but one in which four IRA men were killed along with a number of Black and Tans. ‘It was a complete fiasco. Four great men killed. I knew them all well.’

Greatest detestation for the Free State Army)

He continued in the IRA in the Civil War, fighting against the Treaty. ‘When it came out that you were prepared to hand over a big part of your territory to the British, there was a revulsion against it. People expected a lot—when they found out they got nothing but partition, they got very annoyed.’ While he spoke in a detached sense about British forces during the War of Independence, Keating seemed to reserve his greatest detestation for the Free State Army. He said that some in its ranks in Kerry were demobilised British soldiers who were battle-hardened from the Great War. ‘In the later stages of the war in France, there was a hint, not an order—“no prisoners, dead men”. They murdered all around them, in France. They joined the Free State Army and you could say they were a murder gang.’ Kerry was the scene of brutal fighting in the Civil War. IRA forces captured barracks, and Keating was sent to Limerick to assist in fighting before making his way to Tipperary, where he was to get a flying column from Kerry fighting there to return to help out in Limerick. They were duped into capture by a local, leading to Mountjoy and then the Curragh, where he met others like Tom Barry. ‘I knew him well. In later years I was very friendly with him. No doubt, he was the greatest. But you must say, he had a certain amount of luck on his side.’
Although he fought against the Treaty, he admired Michael Collins and had contempt for Éamon de Valera. ‘Collins did marvellous work in the war against the Tans—but when he went Free Stater then, actually he declared it one time that he was signing his own death warrant. He knew it was wrong, which made it worse. As it went along then he got very bitter.’
‘De Valera? I never liked him. You’d have to ask the question: did de Valera like anyone? I have described him before, as a thorough scoundrel … He was a very devious character. He’d make a statement and it’d have about four different meanings … I always thought there was something queer about him.’
Keating said that republican contacts helped him to get work as a barman in Dublin, before he made his way back to Kerry when a bar he worked in, Brady’s near the GPO, was sold. ‘I went back to Kerry then and I worked in a bread van for a number of years, but I got various jobs through the years all along. I was arrested a number of times; the finish was refusing to answer questions and I was jailed. I lost my job again—came out and was going all right again. There was a lot of turmoil, unemployment was rotten, but I was always able to get something to do. I like work—I always believe you couldn’t exist without work.’
He remained active in the IRA, and was involved in a planned ambush to shoot Blueshirt leader Eoin O’Duffy in Kerry. John Joe Sheehy had ordered the operation, to shoot O’Duffy en route to Tralee in a car from Limerick in 1933. ‘We decided anyway to take him out of it, the IRA in Kerry. Six of us assembled in Ballyseedy. The train is over the road at Ballycarthy. I was up in the railway station and Christy Leen was in the roadside to give me the number of the car when it’d come. The reception party was Johnny O’Connor, John Duggan, my brother Tadhg and Josie Hassett—they were well armed, they had a Thompson machine-gun and two rifles, he wouldn’t escape.’
The registration plate of the car was to be phoned to an office in Tralee by Stephen Coughlan, later to become mayor of Limerick, who was working in the city. ‘We had very strict instructions about the number of the car not to make any mistake. The man that was to give us the word, Stephen Coughlan, his conscience got the best of him and he decided to give the wrong number. And Duffy escaped into town.’ Even though he did not follow him to Tralee, Keating was nevertheless jailed for six months for involvement in a riot that erupted subsequently in the town between Republicans and Blueshirts after O’Duffy’s arrival.
Keating went to England afterwards to work in the bar trade again, returning to Ireland before heading for England once more in 1939 to take part in the disastrous IRA S-Plan bombing campaign. He worked in a bar in The Strand in central London, owned by the Irish publican Mooney, but, unknown to his colleagues, he led an IRA cell in the city. ‘I had a number of men there—three or four active men. We kept ourselves small. And we laid bombs whenever we got the chance. You would have to say we were very successful for a long time. You would select places and one of the places we selected was the Grosvenor Hotel in Park Lane. The bomb was laid at the back of a flowerpot. The only thing was to try and cause as much confusion as we could. But as time went by, what we were doing was nothing. The war was on.’ Keating said that his targets ranged from electricity facilities to bombs left in shops near closing time, timed to go off during the night.
He said that he had no concerns about attacks on civilian targets, but that no one was killed in his operations and none of his unit was captured. His IRA active service career ended when he narrowly evaded capture by Scotland Yard detectives and returned to Ireland. He was interned shortly after his return, before release in 1944. A legacy from a rich aunt in America helped him and his wife, Mary Fleming from Waterford, to set up home in Dublin, where he worked in the bar trade until her death in 1977. Keating said that he offered a safe house to Republicans and, despite having senior policemen as friends and neighbours, stored guns too.
He returned to his native Kerry a year later, but continued working as a barman well into his eighties when friends opened a pub in Kilmallock, Co. Limerick. Keating remained active in the background, siding with the Provisionals in 1970, and followed Ruairí Ó Brádaigh into Republican Sinn Fein (RSF) in 1986 after the split over ending abstention in the Dáil. He was a patron of RSF when he died. In robust health and walking several miles a day unaided until he suffered a stroke in August 2007, Dan Keating passed away on 2 October 2007 in hospital in Tralee. His funeral oration was given by Ruairí Ó Brádaigh.
At the time of his death he was Ireland’s oldest man and the last surviving veteran of the Irish War of Independence.

In proud and loving memory of Dónal Céitinn (1902 – 2007)

Dan Keating joined na Fianna Éireann in 1918. In 1920, during the Irish War of Independence, he joined the 3rd Battalion, 1st Kerry Brigade, of the Irish Republican Army. He was an active volunteer brve and daring. On the 21st of April 1921, an RIC Constable Denis O’Loughlin was shot dead in Knightly’s public house in Tralee. Keating, Jimmy O’Connor and Percy Hanafin were suspected of the killing, and were forced to go on the run. On the 1st of June, Keating was involved in an ambush between Castlemaine and Milltown which saw five members of the crown forces disposed off. Dan’s unit was involved in a gun battle with the British Army near Castleisland which resulted in the deaths of four British soldiers and five IRA volunteers.
Dan Keating opposed the sellout 1921 Anglo-Irish Treaty and remained principled and faithful to Republicanism, going on to fight on the anti-treaty side in the Irish Civil War. He was involved in operations in Kerry, Limerick, and Tipperary, before his column was arrested by Free State Forces. Keating spent seven months in Portlaoise Prison and the Curragh concentration camp before being released in March 1923. He remained committed to the Republican cause and a dedicated IRA volunteer for a long time after the Civil War. He was arrested several times during the 1930s on various charges. He was active in London during the 1939/1940 IRA bombing campaign.
In 1933, he was involved in an attempt to assassinate the leader of the Irish Blueshirts, Eoin O’Duffy, during a visit to County Kerry. The attack was to happen at Ballyseedy, where Free State forces had carried out the Ballyseedy Massacre during the Irish Civil War. However, the plot failed when the person travelling with O’Duffy refused to divulge what car the latter would be travelling in.
Dan returned to Dublin and worked as a barman in several public houses. He later returned to his native Kerry in 1978, living out the rest of his life with relatives in Knockbrack. Until his death he refused to accept a state pension because he considered the 26-county Republic of Ireland an illegitimate state which usurped the 1916 Irish Republic.

“All the talk you hear these days is of peace. But there will never be peace until the people of the 32 counties elect one parliament without British interference.”

In 2002, he refused the state’s standard €2,500 award to centenarians from President Mary McAleese, Keating became patron of Republican Sinn Féin until his own death. He was buried in Kiltallagh Cemetery, Castlemaine.

1916 changed everything
Yet after land reform, relations with the British garrison stationed in Tralee improved. Before 1916, he said, British soldiers mixed freely with locals, with some even joining in pub singsongs. But all was to change after the Easter Rising. ‘I was only 14 when 1916 happened. When the executions got going there was a revulsion of feeling in the county,’ said Keating. He remembered particularly the execution of James Connolly, and the backing it got from William Martin Murphy through the pages of the Irish Independent. Fraternising with locals was at an end for the British regiments, and local women who formed liaisons with soldiers were attacked. ‘Their hair was cut and they were warned off.’

‘Tralee became very militant IRA-wise. When there was some British soldiers shot one November night they decided to have this curfew. You had some very bitter policemen in Tralee also.’ Keating had begun working in Gerry McSeeley’s bar and bakery in Castle Street in Tralee, as an apprentice barman. ‘The first year you got no money, but you were well fed, before rising to a pound a week in the third year.’ His involvement in republicanism came not from lengthy historical or political study but from being swept away in the fervour of the time. He said there was no relevant history taught in schools, and that he and others were simply reacting to events and following each other into the ranks of the IRA. ‘It was the thing to do at the time—there was a wave and you got caught up in that.’ He was too young to join the IRA and joined the youth wing, Fianna Éireann, instead, providing information, from the vantage point of the bar or from elsewhere.
Graduating to the ranks of the IRA, Keating took part in several ambushes and continued intelligence-gathering. Tralee and the surrounding area was by then the scene of serious fighting between the IRA and the Crown forces, including Irishmen in the RIC, several of whom were shot by the local IRA. Under suspicion for one such killing, Keating went on the run but said that he and others in the IRA melted into the local population, who gave them full support. ‘They were great, the local people at the time, they were the soul of Ireland. Without the local people, the Flying Columns couldn’t exist. They’d [the police] get no response from the people. The people were opposed to them at the time, and it continued that way right up to the Truce.’
Rather than boasting about his involvement, Keating said that it was no more than what his contemporaries did. He did not know if he had killed but said that the prospect did not trouble him. Recorded by the BBC in March 2007, he said: ‘When you are involved in an ambush with a crowd of men you wouldn’t know who killed who or what about it. It never troubled me. You were fighting for a just cause and once you have that in the forefront it never troubled you. It never troubled me—it was a job to be done and at the time it was a just cause. And the more that was killed the better you liked it. Everyone was delighted about Kilmichael and other big ones in Cork.’
The largest operation he was involved in was an ambush in Castlemaine. Keating knew of a regular bicycle convoy of Crown forces through the village, and he sought assistance from outside for a major attack. ‘At the outset in Castlemaine there were only two riflemen and about twenty shotgun men, completely inadequate. In the course of the day, some came from Beaufort and one from Farranfore, and there were twelve men who came and they were based in a hut in Keel. Fourteen policemen left Killorglin to go to Tralee to draw the month’s wages. They were in different file, about 30 or 40 yards before every man going. They went and collected their wages anyway and they had a few drinks on the way home, they went into the pubs in Castlemaine—it must be said the publicans were great, no hint in the world [of the ambush plan]. When they went across the bridge at Brackhill Cross they were intercepted, there were eight of them killed, and there was one [unscathed] survivor anyway. He was left to look after the injured.’
He spoke ruefully of a final attack launched in the last hours before the Truce. Hatred of the Black and Tans, RIC and Auxiliaries was such that one final assault was launched, but one in which four IRA men were killed along with a number of Black and Tans. ‘It was a complete fiasco. Four great men killed. I knew them all well.’

Greatest detestation for the Free State Army

Members of the Continuity IRA firing a volley of shots over the grave of Dan Keating on what would have been his 106th birthday, 2 January 2008. (Wikipedia)
Members of the Continuity IRA firing a volley of shots over the grave of Dan Keating on what would have been his 106th birthday, 2 January 2008. (Wikipedia)

He continued in the IRA in the Civil War, fighting against the Treaty. ‘When it came out that you were prepared to hand over a big part of your territory to the British, there was a revulsion against it. People expected a lot—when they found out they got nothing but partition, they got very annoyed.’ While he spoke in a detached sense about British forces during the War of Independence, Keating seemed to reserve his greatest detestation for the Free State Army. He said that some in its ranks in Kerry were demobilised British soldiers who were battle-hardened from the Great War. ‘In the later stages of the war in France, there was a hint, not an order—“no prisoners, dead men”. They murdered all around them, in France. They joined the Free State Army and you could say they were a murder gang.’ Kerry was the scene of brutal fighting in the Civil War. IRA forces captured barracks, and Keating was sent to Limerick to assist in fighting before making his way to Tipperary, where he was to get a flying column from Kerry fighting there to return to help out in Limerick. They were duped into capture by a local, leading to Mountjoy and then the Curragh, where he met others like Tom Barry. ‘I knew him well. In later years I was very friendly with him. No doubt, he was the greatest. But you must say, he had a certain amount of luck on his side.’
Although he fought against the Treaty, he admired Michael Collins and had contempt for Éamon de Valera. ‘Collins did marvellous work in the war against the Tans—but when he went Free Stater then, actually he declared it one time that he was signing his own death warrant. He knew it was wrong, which made it worse. As it went along then he got very bitter.’
‘De Valera? I never liked him. You’d have to ask the question: did de Valera like anyone? I have described him before, as a thorough scoundrel … He was a very devious character. He’d make a statement and it’d have about four different meanings … I always thought there was something queer about him.’
Keating said that republican contacts helped him to get work as a barman in Dublin, before he made his way back to Kerry when a bar he worked in, Brady’s near the GPO, was sold. ‘I went back to Kerry then and I worked in a bread van for a number of years, but I got various jobs through the years all along. I was arrested a number of times; the finish was refusing to answer questions and I was jailed. I lost my job again—came out and was going all right again. There was a lot of turmoil, unemployment was rotten, but I was always able to get something to do. I like work—I always believe you couldn’t exist without work.’
He remained active in the IRA, and was involved in a planned ambush to shoot Blueshirt leader Eoin O’Duffy in Kerry. John Joe Sheehy had ordered the operation, to shoot O’Duffy en route to Tralee in a car from Limerick in 1933. ‘We decided anyway to take him out of it, the IRA in Kerry. Six of us assembled in Ballyseedy. The train is over the road at Ballycarthy. I was up in the railway station and Christy Leen was in the roadside to give me the number of the car when it’d come. The reception party was Johnny O’Connor, John Duggan, my brother Tadhg and Josie Hassett—they were well armed, they had a Thompson machine-gun and two rifles, he wouldn’t escape.’
The registration plate of the car was to be phoned to an office in Tralee by Stephen Coughlan, later to become mayor of Limerick, who was working in the city. ‘We had very strict instructions about the number of the car not to make any mistake. The man that was to give us the word, Stephen Coughlan, his conscience got the best of him and he decided to give the wrong number. And Duffy escaped into town.’ Even though he did not follow him to Tralee, Keating was nevertheless jailed for six months for involvement in a riot that erupted subsequently in the town between Republicans and Blueshirts after O’Duffy’s arrival.
Keating went to England afterwards to work in the bar trade again, returning to Ireland before heading for England once more in 1939 to take part in the disastrous IRA S-Plan bombing campaign. He worked in a bar in The Strand in central London, owned by the Irish publican Mooney, but, unknown to his colleagues, he led an IRA cell in the city. ‘I had a number of men there—three or four active men. We kept ourselves small. And we laid bombs whenever we got the chance. You would have to say we were very successful for a long time. You would select places and one of the places we selected was the Grosvenor Hotel in Park Lane. The bomb was laid at the back of a flowerpot. The only thing was to try and cause as much confusion as we could. But as time went by, what we were doing was nothing. The war was on.’ Keating said that his targets ranged from electricity facilities to bombs left in shops near closing time, timed to go off during the night.
He said that he had no concerns about attacks on civilian targets, but that no one was killed in his operations and none of his unit was captured. His IRA active service career ended when he narrowly evaded capture by Scotland Yard detectives and returned to Ireland. He was interned shortly after his return, before release in 1944. A legacy from a rich aunt in America helped him and his wife, Mary Fleming from Waterford, to set up home in Dublin, where he worked in the bar trade until her death in 1977. Keating said that he offered a safe house to Republicans and, despite having senior policemen as friends and neighbours, stored guns too.
He returned to his native Kerry a year later, but continued working as a barman well into his eighties when friends opened a pub in Kilmallock, Co. Limerick. Keating remained active in the background, siding with the Provisionals in 1970, and followed Ruairí Ó Brádaigh into Republican Sinn Fein (RSF) in 1986 after the split over ending abstention in the Dáil. He was a patron of RSF when he died. In robust health and walking several miles a day unaided until he suffered a stroke in August 2007, Dan Keating passed away on 2 October 2007 in hospital in Tralee. His funeral oration was given by Ruairí Ó Brádaigh.
At the time of his death he was Ireland’s oldest man and the last surviving veteran of the Irish War of Independence.

With many thanks to: McKelvey Steele Cummann Republican Sinn Féin for the original posting.

In proud and loving memory of Dónal Céitinn (1902 – 2007)

Public excluded from trial of IRA accused as surveillance evidence given

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-and-law/courts/public-excluded-from-trial-of-ira-accused-as-surveillance-evidence-given-1.3560600?mode=amp

 

RUC/PSNI attack Republican Sinn Féin Easter Sunday parade in Lurgan

Police officers hold a participant at the event in Lurgan (Image: Press Eye)

A woman was injured and several people are understood to have been arrested after police moved in on a Republican Sinn Fein event.

The ‘colour party’ held in Lurgan was an Easter Rising commemoration.

Footage online showed heated scenes between the PSNI and those attending the event at the Edward Costello Memorial Garden in the Kilwilkee estate.

DUP MLA Carla Lockhart praised the actions of the PSNI.

PSNI move in on Lurgan Republican Sinn Fein event

She said: “I very much welcome the police operation to stop this illegal parade and glorification of terrorists.

“I hear plenty of comments from republicans on legal Orange parades but they are strangely silent when republicans decide to march whenever they want glorifying terror in an illegal march.

Top cop wants Oglaigh na hEireann ceasefire to include ‘criminality within communities’
“It is good to see a robust operation to prevent this illegality rather than a follow up arrest operation some weeks later. I congratulate the PSNI Commanders who authorised this operation and the officers on the ground who implemented this plan so effectively.”

 

 

With many thanks to: Belfast Live for the origional story.

Today the 26th January 2018 the 1st year anniversary of veteran Belfast republican Victor Notarantonio.

Republican Sinn Fein would like to remember with pride Victor Notarantonio A genuine true republican to the end, A comrade and A friend. The Notarantonio family has long standing history of Irish republicanism through the generations. Victor’s father Francisco Notarantonio was an IRA volunteer and a former republican internee shot dead in 1987 when the british army colluded and directed the loyalist UFF/UDA to murder him. Victor himself was a committed IRA volunteer he was also interned in the 1970’s and was held in the maidstone prison ship in Belfast lough.Through the decades Victor battled the british army, the RUC and loyalist death squads.

Victor gave his life to the cause he was a strong outspoken critic of the direction the reformist Provisional element were intent on, there path to joining the british administration. He was fully dedicated in his effort to stand vast to republican principles and upholding the Irish RepubliCumann. memory of Oglach Victor Notarantonio.

With many thanks to the: McKelvey Steele Cumann

Republican Sinn Féin (RSF) will be holding a protest in Monaghan Street Newry on Saturday 3rd February at 1pm.

The purpose of the protest is to highlight the blatant intermnent of Gabriel Mackle in Maghaberry jail.

Gabriel Mackle is is one of three currently interned by the British State, the other two are Tony Taylor and Neil Hegarty. These three men are Not the first and have joined The long list of Irish Men and Women who have suffered under The British Injustice system. The Irish people do not stand a chance of fair treatment under British occupation.

We call on all Republicans to join us on the streets of Newry to show your support for Gabriel and the other political internees.

With many thanks to: Chris Hamll, Republican Sinn Féin

Members of the Thomas Harte cuman Republican Sinn Féin erected more boards in North Armagh today

The boards highlight the current use of internment in Ireland. Gabriel Mackle, Neil Hegarty and Tony Taylor are currently interned without charge, without trial and without any justification.

Also the attempted extradition of Liam Campbell is highlighted. The free state government are currently trying to have him extradited to Lithuania where he will face inhumane prison conditions and breaches of his human rights.

With many thanks to: Chris Hamll – Republican Sinn Féin