Just Published ~ Out of the Ashes: An Oral History of the Provisional Irish Republican Movement.

Out of the Ashes is the definitive history of the Provisional Irish Republican movement, from its formation at the outset of the modern ‘Troubles’ up to and after their official disarmament in 2005. Robert White, a prolific observer of the IRA and Sinn Féin’s activities, has amassed an incomparable body of interview material from leading members of the organisation over a thirty-year period. Check out the link here, thankyou: https://goo.gl/jyQQfm

With many thanks to: Irish Academic Press – Merrion press.

Remembering Óglach Robert Carr, Newry Brigade – Irish Republican Army (IRA), who died on this day 1st April 1980.

Óglach Robert Carr, Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA), died on this day 1st April 1980.

Robert Manus Carr (commonly known as Bob) was born on 7th April 1959 in Quay St, Newry. His parents, Noel and Josie, lived in the ÓNeill Avenue area and they had one other child, Mary.

In the mid 70s Bob Joined a local unit of the IRA determined to fight for his country’s freedom.

In March 1980, Bob was critically injured in a premature explosion at the Customs Post on the Dublin Road. He recieved terrible burns to his body from which he never recovered. He died on the 1st April, six days before his 21st Birthday.

News of his death came as a great shock to his family and friends. His family treasure his memories and his comrades remember him with pride.

With many thanks to: Clan na Gael.

Óglach Thomas Murphy, aged 22, F Company, 6th Battalion, Dublin Brigade, Irish Republican Army (IRA).

Óglach Thomas Murphy, aged 22.

Murdered in his bed by Black and Tans at ‘The Hotel’, Foxrock Village, on this day 1921.

At the time of his death, Thomas or ‘Tommy’ Murphy, a popular young uilleann-piper, was one of a number of young men active with the local IRA company, a unit made up of men from the Deansgrange, Cornelscourt, Cabinteely and Foxrock districts. By the summer of 1921, several of it’s members had been forced ‘on the run’ and began operating as a full-time ‘flying column’, sleeping rough in stables and sheds and harassing crown forces at any opportunity that presented itself.

Attacks on the local RIC barracks at Cabinteely were numerous. In the dead of night, Volunteers, acting under cover of darkness, would make their way to the village, where they would creep along the empty streets, taking up positions before subjecting the barracks to a sustained attack using rifles and home-made bombs. Just weeks before his death, Thomas Murphy, dressed in a chauffeur’s uniform in order to give the appearance of a British officer, had driven a car at top speed past the barracks while the car’s other two occupants lobbed bombs at the Black and Tan sentries posted outside.

On May 13th, local Volunteer Charles ‘Rodney’ Murphy (no relation) of Deansgrange, scaled a tree in the Brennanstown Road area, using his elevated position overlooking the barracks to snipe at two Black and Tans tending to the gardens in the yard out back. Constable Albert Edward Skeats, a Black and Tan recruit from London, was hit behind the ear and rushed to a hospital in the city, where he lay critically ill. He eventually succumbed to his injuries on May 28th. The night after his death, a party of Tans and RIC returning to their barracks were ambushed at Monaloe cross-roads by Volunteers Jackie Nolan, John Merriman and Billy Fitzgibbon. During a brisk gunfight, one constable was wounded before the Volunteers made their escape across fields.

With one of their number dead and another now seriously injured, tensions inside Cabinteely barracks had reached boiling point. Just before three o’clock in the morning, a party of five Tans, faces blackened with shoe polish, made their way along Brennanstown Road to Foxrock, where they stopped at ‘The Hotel’, a large tenement building that once stood in the centre of the village. It was here that Volunteer Thomas Murphy resided along with his widowed mother and four sisters. As the building was home to several families, the front door was left open, enabling the Tans to make their way inside unnoticed. They then quietly made their way to Thomas’ room before bursting through his bedroom door, waking the startled man from his sleep. One of the intruders asked if he was Thomas Murphy, and when he replied that he was, a shot was fired, hitting the young man through his head, the bullet passing through the wall into the adjacent room. As the intruders left, Thomas’ mother and sisters rushed into the room to find their son in a collapsed state. Despite the best efforts of a local doctor, Thomas died where he lay several hours later.

On June 1st, Thomas’ remains were buried at Deansgrange Cemetery following a military enquiry. In a large funeral cortege, members of the Dublin and South Eastern Railway Company, where Thomas worked as a porter, marched in a body after the hearse. Numerous wreaths were placed over the coffin, which was wrapped in a tricolour flag. Thomas’ IRA comrades supplied a guard of honour and firing party. Three volleys of shots were fired as the coffin was lowered into the grave, before men and arms managed to get safely out of the cemetery through a cordon of British military.

With many thanks to: Sean Larkin, South Derry.

‘IRA” says it struck police vehicle with EFP (explosively formed projectile).

THE Republican paramilitary group known as the ‘IRA’ last night claimed it was “confident” it struck an RUC/PSNI vehicle with an EFP mortar in Strabane last week.

In a statement the organisation, sometimes referred to as the ‘New IRA’, said it fired the potentially lethal device at the passing patrol car at Townsend Street in the Tyrone town last Tuesday night. The group claims the EFP (explosively formed projectile) mortar contained Semtex and was triggered by command wire and fired from a distance of nine feet at the police vehicle as it passed at around 8pm. The ‘IRA’ claims that the mortar was moved from another location in the border town earlier on Tuesday after the security forces failed to show up.

Using a recognised codeword, the republican group claimed that an attempt to target a police car with the same device at Townsend Street was abandoned an hour before the attack because of the prescence of civillian vehicles in the area. The RUC/PSNI has said that the device, which it described as a “roadside bomb with command wire attached” was “designed to kill or seriously injure” its officers. Three officers who were travelling in the vehicle were uninjured but believed to be left shaken. The RUC/PSNI vehicle left the area after the attack and police were later criticised for failing to cordon off the scenne for three hours.

Several people were removed from their homes during a follow up operation but later allowed to return. Politicians have condemned the latest attack which came just weeks after the ‘IRA’ tried to kill a Catholic police officer in Derry using an undercar bomb. Policing Board member and SDLP MLA Daniel McCrossan said: “Such attacks on the PSNI (RUC) have no place in a modern progressive society.” DUP MLA Tom Buchánan said: “There must be a united and resolute stand from right across the political spectrum to such activities.”

In August 2015, a motar was discovered and disarmed at a cemetery in Strabane after a security operation. EFPs, which can pierce armour over a long distance, have been used by the ‘IRA’ in Derry and Belfast in the past. On those occasions no-one was injured. Unexploded EFPs have also been recovered by the security forces accross the north. Believed to have been developed in Iran, the homemade weapon was regularly used in Iraq. It is considered by some as the modern version of the horizontal mortar – known to republicans as a ‘doodle bug’ – which was used by the Provisionals. Meanwhile, police have been given additional time to question a 20-year-old man arrested in Newtownstewart in connection with the attack last week, while a 31-year-old man arrested on Saturday continued to be questioned last night.

With many thanks to: The Irish News, for the orgional story.

Óglach Martin Meehan Commemoration Saturday 14/11/2015.

We reminder about next Saturday’s Commemoration folks….
– – -FEEL FREE TO SHARE- – –

Assemble 12.00pm – Departs 12.30pm Frankfield Street, Glasgow.
All relevant groups and banners welcome.

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Óglach Martin Meehan Commemoration - Glasgow

http:// https://m.facebook.com/dakota29#!/photo.php?fbid=1050800754959856&id=100000898239596&set=a.314212501952022.80140.100000898239596&source=48

With many thanks to: Eddie Healy.
http:// https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1050800754959856&id=100000898239596&set=a.314212501952022.80140.100000898239596&source=48#!/eddie.healy.92

IRA Volunteer Hugh Coney, a native of Coalisland, Co Tyone, was shot dead by the British Army while attempting to escape from Long Kesh on 6th November 1974.

Following the introduction of internment in August 1971, the internees were initially held in Magilligan Prison, Co Derry, and the Maidstone Prison Ship, moored in Belfast Lough.

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Oglach Hugh Coney - Coalisland, Co Tyrone.

https://m.facebook.com/dakota29#!/Seachranaidhe/posts/908936895852752?ref=m_notif&notif_t=like&soft=notifications

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Maidstone Prison Ship - moored at Belfast Lough
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Magillign Prison - 1970s.
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Magilligan Prison - as it is today.

For more information on Oglach Hugh Coney, please click on the link below for more details:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maze_Prison_escape

Maidstone Prison Ship click on the link below for more details:

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HMP Maidstone in the harbour of Algiers. Alongside HMP Safari and HMS Sahib

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Maidstone_(1937)

With many thanks to: Stephen Codd (Stiofán Mac Óda) :
https://m.facebook.com/dakota29#!/StiofanMacOda?fref=nf&pn_ref=story&ref=bookmarks

– IRNF:
https://m.facebook.com/dakota29#!/groups/611797022229595?notif_t=group_activity&ref=m_notif

Christina ‘Dina’ Hunter was born in 1901. At the time the Hunter family were living in a one room tenement at number 7 McGuinness Court.

Her father was a coach painter, while her mother, Sarah was a house kepper. They already had a two-year-old son John. They would later move to number 25 Townsend Street, another one room tenement, and the family would expand to include Sarah, Liziebeth and Jane Frances.

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Christy and Dina Crothers nee Hunter

https://m.facebook.com/dakota29#!/groups/250140148442168?view=permalink&id=798365180286326&ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity

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Kathleen Lynn.
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The Funeral of Thomas Ashe.
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Sean Hunter (Johnny).

With many thanks to: Gillean Robertson Miller –
http:// https://m.facebook.com/groups/250140148442168?view=permalink&id=798365180286326&ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity#!/gillean.miller?fref=nf&ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity

1916 Easter Rising Historical Society.
http:// https://m.facebook.com/groups/250140148442168?view=permalink&id=798365180286326&ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity#!/groups/250140148442168?ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_activity