How police can download the private content of your phone in MINUTES without a warrant and with ‘no limit on the volume of data’

Officers can use a machine to extract all kinds of information from phones. This includes location data, deleted pictures and encrypted messages

 

Experts warn there is ‘no limit on the volume of data’ police can obtain
The UK police can download your phone data without a warrant in a matter of minutes, a shocking video has revealed.

They warn there is ‘no limit on the volume of data’ police can obtain, and it could happen even if charges are never bought.

Machine police use to download phone data without a warrant in March

London-based charity Privacy International has highlighted how police access people’s passwords, internet searches and emails without prior permission.

The technology, which was shown on BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire show, is currently used by at least 26 police forces in England and Wales.

Using this machine, officers are able to access deleted data, including messages sent to the phone by other people. From deleted files to location history, IT expert reveals the extent of the personal data the search giant holds on you

The decision to download this information is decided on a case-by-case basis, according to the National Police Chiefs Council.

However, there was never a public announcement about these police powers.

Out of 47 police forces contacted by Privacy International, only eight said they had implemented guidelines on use of the technology.

There is ‘no limit on the volume of data’ police can obtain, Millie Graham-Wood, a solicitor at Privacy International said on the Victoria Derbyshire show.

The UK police can download your phone data without a warrant in a matter of minutes, a shocking video has revealed.

The footage shows officers can use a machine (pictured) to extract all kinds of information, including location data, deleted pictures and messages

 

The UK police can download your phone data without a warrant in a matter of minutes, a shocking video has revealed.

Opposition groups have argued that the police should not be able to access this data, which can currently used on suspects, victims and witnesses

 

WHAT INFORMATION COULD THE POLICE GET FROM YOUR PHONE?

The UK police have a machine that can download your phone data without a warrant in a matter of minutes.

Officers can use a machine to extract all kinds of information, including location data, deleted pictures and encrypted messages.

Opposition groups warn there is ‘no limit on the volume of data’ police can obtain, and it could happen even if charges are never bought.

Using this machine, officers are able to access deleted data, including messages sent to the phone by other people.

The service can take everything of one type off a phone. For example, if a witness’s phone has photos that police want the device can download all images.

The decision to download this information is decided on a case-by-case basis, according to the National Police Chiefs Council.

The technology is currently used by at least 26 police forces in England and Wales.

Out of 47 police forces contacted by Privacy International, only eight said they had implemented guidelines on use of the technology.

The technology is also currently being trialled in Scotland but is not being used in Northern Ireland.

In Derbyshire and Wiltshire, the police can even download a phone’s contents without the suspect’s knowledge.

‘The most worrying thing is that this can happen on arrest, even when charges are never even bought’, she said.

However, the police have warned that this was ‘just not practical’.

‘In lots of cases, officers need to be able to access what is on a mobile phone very very quickly and to be able to know whether they can arrest the offender to protect the public and to stop other crimes in action,’ said former Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable Sir Peter Fahy.

The technology is also currently being trialled in Scotland but is not being used in Northern Ireland.

The decision to download this information is decided on a case-by-case basis, according to the National Police Chiefs Council (Stock Image)

 

There is ‘no limit on the volume of data’ police can obtain, Millie Graham-Wood (pictured), a solicitor at Privacy International said on the Victoria Derbyshire show

 

 

International said on the Victoria Derbyshire show
In Derbyshire and Wiltshire, the police can even download a phone’s contents without the suspect’s knowledge.

A Home Office spokesperson told BBC that the police needed ‘the appropriate powers to tackle crime’.

‘Current legislation allows data to be accessed when there are reasonable grounds to believe it contains evidence in relation to an offence and only then in adherence with data protection and human rights obligations’, they said.

‘The government is clear that the use of all police powers must be necessary, proportionate and lawful.’

In Derbyshire and Wiltshire, the police can even download a phone’s contents without the suspect’s knowledge.

A Home Office spokesperson told BBC that the police needed ‘the appropriate powers to tackle crime’

In Derbyshire and Wiltshire, the police can even download a phone’s contents without the suspect’s knowledge. A Home Office spokesperson told BBC that the police needed ‘the appropriate powers to tackle crime’

WHAT ARE PREDICTIVE POLICING SYSTEMS?
Predictive policing systems can forecast when and where crimes occur using based on prior crime reports and other data.

Palantir Technologies has licensed its predictive policing software with local and international governments.

Most ingest vast amounts of data, including geography, criminal records, the weather and social media records.

From that, it makes predictions about individuals or places that are likely to be involved in a crime, according to the Verge.

There are other predictive policing systems out there that are being utilized, many of them are different.

The Los Angeles Police Department, New York Police Department, Chicago Police Department and, now, the New Orleans Police Department use predictive policing. File photo Chicago’s police department uses a notorious ‘heat list,’

 

which is an algorithm-generated list that singles out people who are most likely to be involved in a shooting.

However, many experts have identified issues with Chicago’s heat list.

The government-funded RAND Corporation published a report saying that the heat list wasn’t nearly as effective as a standard wanted list.

It could also encourage a new form of profiling that draws unnecessary police attention to people.

Another academic study found that the heat list can have a ‘disparate impact’ on poor communities of color.

A California startup called PredPol also built predictive policing software that’s been utilized by law enforcement officials, including the LAPD.

In 2016, researchers conducted a study where they reverse engineered PredPol’s algorithm and discovered that it replicated systemic bias against communities of color that were over policed.

It also found that historic data isn’t a good indicator of future criminal activity.

The NYPD also had an agreement with Palantir Technologies to use its predictive policing systems.

With many thanks to the: Daily Mail and Phoebe Weston for the original story

Brexit contributing to sectarian violence, warns key player in the North of Ireland peace talks

A car is set a light in the Creggan area of Derry last Thursday night, the night Lyra McKee was shot dead

 

Former government advisor Jonathan Powell has said Brexit is contributing to sectarian violence in the North of Ireland, although he was careful to stress it was not the cause.

Jonathan Powell worked as Downing Street Chief of Staff under then prime minister Tony Blair from 1997 to 2007 and played a key role in the peace talks that led to the Good Friday Agreement.

He told the BBC’s Today programme that Brexit was one of a number of factors leading to increased violence in the North of Ireland.

Read More:
Suzanne Breen: Pathetic New IRA statement did not offer one ounce of comfort to any one

‘A gentle, innocent soul who wouldn’t wish ill on anyone’ – Lyra McKee’s family pay tribute
Alban Maginness: Foster’s healing moment at rally for Lyra has the potential to melt permafrost in Executive “I think it would be quite wrong to say either the political crisis in the North of Ireland – the institutions having fallen over and not being put back up again, the essence of the Good Friday Agreement – nor Brexit caused this,” Mr Powell said.

“The trouble with it is it’s sitting out there as a political crisis and this sort of mindless violence can then fall into that.”

Mr Powell said further violence could be prevented if the Government take action.

“If we (the Government) took stupid steps this could lead to a real crisis,” he said.

“I don’t believe for a second the British Government will do that, but the fact the political crisis is out there – both Brexit and the failure to put the institutions up again – is a real problem and that is a tinder for this kind of violence.

Jonathan Powell was chief British negotiator in the Belfast Agreement talks

 

“This kind of violence is pointless by itself but it could affect this political wasteland out there, which is not really being addressed by the British Government in a sufficient way.”

Following the murder of Lyra McKee in Derry City last Thursday Mr Powell dismissed the New IRA as “pathetic” and with little support from the community.

“This is a pathetic little group that has very little capacity,” he said.

“It isn’t really a threat to the long-term peace in the North of Ireland – it’s not like the IRA in the bad old days.

“The IRA – Sinn Fein used to get 30% of the Catholic support in the elections at the height of the Troubles, so they had real and genuine political support. They represented a real strand of opinion in the North of Ireland.

“This group can barely get a couple of councillors elected, it does not represent a political strand in the North of Ireland so I don’t think they are a threat.”

With many thanks to the: Belfast Telegraph for the original story

Saoradh’s Twitter and Facebook accounts suspended

Women smear red handprints on slogans outside the office of a political group linked to the New IRA

 

Social media giants Facebook and Twitter have suspended the accounts of the dissident republican party Saoradh.

Saoradh, which translates as liberation in Irish, has the support of the New IRA.

The paramilitary group carried out the murder of journalist Lyra McKee, whose funeral takes place on Wednesday.

Paddy Gallagher, spokesman for Saoradh, said that the party was aware the accounts have been suspended.

‘New IRA’ admits responsibility for killing
‘Her commitment to truth was absolute’
Timeline of Irish dissident activity
He added that there would be “no comment”.

In a statement, a Twitter spokesperson said: “We have clear Terms of Service in place which we enforce when violations are identified.”

A Saoradh spokesperson said that the party would not comment on the suspensions Image copyright © TWITTER

According to its terms of service, common reasons for suspending a Twitter account include spam, account security at risk and abusive tweets or behaviour.

With many thanks to: BBCNI and Leanna Byrne for the original story

FOUR MEN CHARGED OVER EAST BELFAST UDA DRUG DEALING RACKET

OFFICERS from the Paramilitary Crime Task Force arrested and charged four men aged 34, 34, 28 and 27 in relation to the supply of class B drugs yesterday, Tuesday, April 23.

This follows three searches in the Kilcooley area of Bangor which were carried out as part of an operation focussed on the criminal activities of East Belfast UDA.

A quantity of Class B drugs with an estimated street value of £2000 was discovered at one of the locations and a quantity of cash was also seized.

Two of the men aged 34 and 27 were charged with being concerned in the supply of class B drugs.

The other two men aged 34 and 28 were charged in relation to possession of a class B drug with intent to supply, possession of a class B drug and possession of criminal property.

All of the men are due to appear at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court next month on Thursday, May 16.

As is normal practice all charges will be reviewed by the PPS.

With many thanks to the: Belfast Daily for the original story

Dawn Purvis: UVF ‘hasn’t gone anywhere’

Dawn Pervis says there are members of the UVF who do not want the paramilitary group ‘to leave the stage’ Image copyright © PACEMAKER

 

former leader of the Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) the political wing of the UVF, has said the paramilitary Ulster Volunteer Force “hasn’t gone anywhere”, despite decommissioning its weapons in 2009.

Dawn Purvis said she had “taken people at their word” when the group announced it wanted to “leave the stage” in 2007.

However, when UVF members were implicated in a murder in 2010, she said she felt “cheated”.

The PUP has long been acknowledged as the political wing of the UVF.

The UVF is a loyalist paramilitary group that was responsible for hundreds of murders during the Troubles in the North the Ireland.

PUP ‘keep link with loyalist UVF’
Who are the UVF?
‘Impossible to get out’ of paramilitaries
Remembering the loyalist ceasefire
Loyalists ‘left behind’ since 1998

In some cases, its members continue to be heavily involved in violence and crime.

Last month, the PSNI (Police Service of Northern Ireland) said the UVF was “flooding the streets of Belfast” with drugs.

Expulsion promise?
The PUP played a prominent role in supporting the peace process of 1998.

In 2018, loyalist paramilitary organisations said they fully support the rule of law and suggested any members involved in crime would be expelled.

The joint statement was issued by the UVF, Ulster Defence Association (UDA) and the Red Hand Commando.

Church leaders sit with loyalist paramilities in 2018

It was the first time such a move had been made since the loyalist ceasefire in October 1994.

‘They didn’t trust me’
Dawn Purvis was the first woman to lead the PUP.

She held the post from 2007, following the death of her predecessor David Ervine, until 2010.

Dawn Purvis led the PUP the political wing of the UVF from 2007 to 2010 Image copyright © PACEMAKER

Speaking to the BBC’s Talkback programme, she said was “gobsmacked” to learn that Mr Ervine had nominated her to replace him before he died.

“I thought it was incredible, and I saw it as a huge honour that out of everyone in the party and every colleague and every member, that he thought I was capable and up for the job.”

“My relationship with the UVF was different to the relationship that David had with the UVF and that was clear from the start,” she explained.

“David came from within, he was one of them.”

Who is Dawn Purvis?
1966: Born in the loyalist Donegall Pass area of south Belfast
1994: Joined the Progressive Unionist Party
1997-98: Talks co-ordinator for the PUP during the multi-party talks leading to the Good Friday Agreement
2007-2011: MLA for East Belfast
2007-2010: PUP leader
2012-2015: Director of Belfast Marie Stopes Clinic

“He had been a member of the UVF, he had served time as a UVF prisoner, and I was regarded as a woman with no paramilitary history or record – no prison record.

“Therefore, what would I know?

“They didn’t trust me, but I made it clear that the relationship I wanted, and the relationship I was there for, was to see through David Ervine’s project.

“And that was to bring paramilitarism to an end, and to see the decommissioning of weapons and the disbandment of the UVF.”

A memorial was erected in East Belfast after David Ervine’s death Image copyright © ALBERT BRIDGE/CC GEOGRAPH

 

In 2007, the organisation declared that it was renouncing violence.

Ms Purvis added: “I truly believed in 2007, when David died and the UVF issued their endgame statement that we were heading in that direction.

“With decommissioning in 2009, I thought: ‘Great. The next step is for the UVF to go away and leave the stage.'”

However, she said that all changed in 2010.

‘Killed off the PUP’
The day after a friend’s wedding in Donegal, Dawn Purvis received a call from a journalist, telling her that Bobby Moffett, a loyalist, had been murdered on the Shankill Road in Belfast.

“I realised then that there were people who didn’t want to go away,” she told the BBC.

“They never wanted to leave the stage.

The police say the UVF still remains active in criminal activity Image copyright © PACEMAKER

“In the context of their end-game statement, in the context of them having decommissioned weapons the previous year, I thought: ‘This is not the way to go. This is not the right way forward. They have just killed off the PUP.’

“I felt, having taken people at their word in 2007, that we were working towards this, we were going to achieve this – David Ervine’s project – but now it was not going to be deliverable.

“Certainly not with me at the head of the PUP,” she said.

Dawn Purvis joins William Crawley in studio for a BBC Radio Ulster Talkback special

She resigned from the PUP leadership and left the party, remaining as an independent MLA until losing her seat in the 2011 election.

It may have marked the end of Ms Purvis’ career in politics, but she continued to maintain a high public profile.

From 2012 to 2015, she led the work of the Marie Stopes Clinic in Belfast during a time of intense public controversy around abortion laws in the North of Ireland.

Ms Purvis is now the chief executive for a housing charity that is based outside Belfast.

You can catch up with Dawn Purvis’ interview on BBC Radio Ulster’s Talkback on the BBC Sounds app.

With many thanks to: BBCNI for the original story

Murdered journalist’s friends protest outside dissidents republican group’s office

They left red handprints on the walls of Junior McDade House in Derry

 

 

Friends of murdered journalist Lyra McKee have defaced an office belonging to a dissident republican group by putting red handprints on the walls of its headquarters in Londonderry.

The group held the protest over the murder of the talented journalist and published author.

A number of Miss McKee’s friends walked to Junior McDaid House in Derry, where they used a pot of red paint to place handprints on the side of the office walls.

Friends of murdered journalist Lyra McKee (Cate McCurry/PA)

A group of some six men, understood to be members of republican group Saoradh, who are associated with the New IRA, stood outside the building during the intense protest.

PSNI officers were also present and later asked for the names of those involved in the incident.

The dissident republican New IRA is being blamed for shooting the young journalist in the head.

The gunman was aiming at police during disturbances in the Creggan when he hit the 29-year-old on Thursday.

Her killing has been widely condemned across the political spectrum.

Red paint was used to symbolize the killers having ‘blood on their hands’ (Cate McCurry/PA)

 

Lyra’s friend Sinead Quinn, who took part on Monday’s protest, said: “We have used red paint because they have blood on their hands for what has happened.

“They have encouraged it, they have moulded these young people into what they are and they are standing behind them handing them guns.

“They need to take responsibility today for what has happened.

“They have shirked it so far by saying it was an accidental shooting. You don’t shoot accidentally.”

She added: “When you put a gun into someone’s hand and they shoot it, that’s murder.

“Lyra deserves more and I am so glad there are so many people here today to see and watch these men looking at us.

“They are not a representation of republican people in this town.

“Those people don’t represent (republicanism). Nobody can advocate shooting into a crowd of people and shooting a 29-year-old woman dead.

“People have been afraid to stand up to people like this, we are not afraid.”

Another friend said: “We have had enough. There is a younger generation coming up in the town and they don’t need guns put in their hands.

“They need jobs, they need a better health service and education.

“They need a life, not a gun put in their hands.”

The group of friends have pledged to do more in Lyra’s memory.

“Lyra’s McKee’s name will never be forgotten in this town,” Ms Quinn added.

“We have to do it for her.”

There is mood change here, even hardline republicans are speaking out against them and saying they need to desist

Local resident John Lindsay
Local resident John Lindsay said: “We are using this as an opportunity to speak out against these people.

“The whole town has told them they are not wanted here.

“They have freedom to speak, they don’t have freedom for violence and they don’t have the right to carry out acts of violence.

“There is mood change here, even hardline republicans are speaking out against them and saying they need to desist.

“My message to them is go away and get off our backs and stop dragging children into the past into a life of misery.”

The protest comes as up to 200 members and supporters of Saoradh took part in an Easter Monday commemoration march in west Belfast.

A similar march that was to be held in Derry on Monday was called off following the murder of Miss McKee.

The group’s national chairman Brian Kenna called for the New IRA to apologise for the murder during a speech he delivered at Milltown Cemetery.

With many thanks to: BT and the Press Association for the original story