In the name of the son – THE GERRY CONLON STORY.

Miscarriage of justice victim Gerry Conlon spent the best part of £120,000 in six weeks on crack cocaine as he struggled to come to terms with life outside prison.

Previously unpublished details of the justice campaigner’s fight to beat a potentially deadly drug addiction are contained in a new book written by his childhood friend Richard O’Rawe.

The author reveals that since his release from prison in 1989, Mr Conlon “went through the guts of £1million” earned through compensation along with book and film deals.

In the Name of the Son: The Gerry Conlon Story delves into the battles faced by the west Belfast man following his release from prison after he was falsely convicted of involvement in the 1974 Guildford pub bombings, which claimed the lives of four British soldiers and a civilian.
Mr Conlon, Paul Hill, Paddy and Carol Richardson were all wrongfully convicted of taking part in the attacks.

As well as providing a gripping account of Gerry Conlon’s descent into addiction and successful battle to beat his deadly habit in the years after his release, the book also explores new evidence that suggests authorities knew the Guildford Four could not have carried out the attack.
He also says that Mr Conlon believed he and his co-accused had been “framed” rather being simply the victims of a miscarriage of justice.

It is revealed that in just six weeks Mr Conlon worked his way through £120,000, the bulk of it being spent on crack cocaine as his life spiralled out of control.

The Belfast man received the cash for the 1993 hit film In the Name of the Father, in which he was played by Daniel Day-Lewis.

The author reveals that as Conlon’s cash started to run out, which included compensation for his time spent in prison, he forked out up to £10,000 a day on drugs and giving handouts to people he viewed as needy.

He also funded his own justice campaigns, which often involved travel around the world.

But as the cash eventually became scarce he and his remaining close circle of friends were forced into desperate measures and for a while lived off food scavenged from bins in the affluent Mayfair area of London.

Speaking to the Irish News, Mr O’Rawe said his childhood friend used drugs to try and escape the memories of his past.
“Gerry put on this wonderful person in public where he was so confident and cocky jack the lad and everything else,” he said.
“So when he went home he had nightmare after nightmare – every night he had nightmares.
“He took drugs to try and keep himself awake so he wouldn’t sleep, so he wouldn’t have the nightmares.”
“I’m not saying that’s the reason he took drugs, but it’s one of them.”
Mr O’Rawe says that his pal regularly “woke up in bed…. and he would have been soaking, the bed would have been ringing, you could have rung the sheets out, squealing, ‘get off me, stop beating me”.
“This was every night,” he said.
“Gerry never escaped that for the whole time that he was alive.”
Such was the grip crack cocaine had on him, even when he returned to Belfast in the mid-1990s his then girlfriend often travelled from England to deliver the drugs to him, and sent it through the post, at a time when the use of the drug was practically unheard of in the city.

After his release Mr Conlon was surrounded by a wide circle of friends, which included celebrities like Hollywood actor Johnny Depp and former Pogues front man Shane MacGowan.

Mr O’Rawe said that Mr Conlon’s generosity was well known and that those who shared his addiction also flocked to him.
“When Gerry took crack, Gerry had a crowd around him,” he said.
“Gerry was like Father Christmas.
“All the crack heads in London loved him because, I don’t know what way you buy crack and I don’t even know what way you buy dope, but the point is Gerry used buy £10,000 worth at a time.”

Mr O’Rawe believes that his old pal’s trauma stemmed from guilt over the arrest and wrongful conviction of his father Giuseppe for the Guildford bombings along with other members of the group that became known as the Maguire Seven.
Suffering from ill health, Giuseppe Conlon died in an English prison in January 1980
“He was haunted by his father,” Mr O’Rawe said.
“He never, ever got over Giuseppe.
“He absolutely blamed himself.
“You couldn’t have spoken to him about it, you couldn’t have talked to him.”
“It didn’t matter that he knew nothing about Guilford – that he had been tortured into signing confessions.
“It didn’t matter, he blamed himself up until his dying day.”
He said that as Mr Conlon descended into despair “suicide was never far away from his mind”.

Mr O’Rawe, a former republican prisoner and ‘blanket man’ who has previously written books about the 1981 hunger strike, lived close to Mr Conlon in the Lower Falls area where the pair were best friends and schoolmates.

He says they were reunited after almost 18 years following a chance encounter in Belfast city centre days after Mr Conlon was released from prison.
After going out for a drink they bumped into former IRA commander Brendan ‘The Dark’ Hughes, a former cellmate of Mr O’Rawe, who joined them.
Although Mr Conlon denied it, the former IRA man was said to be the person who ordered him to leave Belfast in the 1970s.
“The three of us went to a pub and we were, well, stocious, and the craic was 90,” Mr O’Rawe said.
He said that writing the book about a man he describes as being like a brother has been both a traumatic and rewarding experience for him.

He said that around eight months before he died in 2014 Mr Conlon asked him to write his story and then later sent for him during his final days.

He emotionally recounts his last meeting with his friend and how he brought a fry into him as he lay seriously ill in the Royal Victoria Hospital.
“He actually ate it and he said to me ‘you’re going to write that for me aren’t you?
“I said ‘I will, I told you I will’.
He said ‘that’s OK, that’s good enough for me’.
“It’s very sad and then on the way out the door he said ‘I love you’.
“It near killed me. That’s the last I seen him alive.”
“It was awful traumatic, it was awful for me. I am an emotional guy anyway, I loved Gerry.
“I really did, he was my mate and he was like a brother to me. “His loss was awful, truly awful.”
The author says he takes comfort from Mr Conlon’s legacy as a campaigner for others in similar situations and reflects on the “goodness that was in him and the goodness that people saw”.
“Gerry Conlon had a profound effect on everybody he met,” he said.
“And I take great comfort from that I think he was a really decent human being who cared about other people.”
He also believes that his old friend eventually conquered his demons before his death after an illness in June 2014.
“Gerry won the war, Gerry came out triumphant,” he said.

In the Name of the Son: The Gerry Conlon Story is published today by Merrion Press.

With many thanks to: James Connolly. 

http://www.irishnews.com/news/2017/10/05/news/gerry-conlon-blew-almost-1-million-1154156/

Follow these links for more information: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Name-Son-Gerry-Conlon-Story/dp/178537138X

Follow this link: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/05/johnny-depp-says-he-would-have-taken-a-bullet-for-gerry-conlon

Follow this link: http://www.miscarriagesofjustice.org/4399-2/

 

Tony Blair was ‘NOT STRIGHT’ and “NEVER WAS” with the UK over the “ILLIGAL WAR” with Iraq !

THE LABOUR LEADER OF THE PARTY JEREMY CORBYN STOOD WITH THE PEOPLE. AGAINST AN ILLIGEAL WAR IN IRAQ

Tony Blair was not “straight with the nation” according to the BBC but we all already new that before the “Illigal war/murder of innocent civilians started”

THE BRITISH PUBLIC CALLED FOR “NO WAR WITH IRAQ” !!!

The British, Scottish, Welsh and Irish Nations called for ‘No War With Iraq’ !!!


THE DUP IN GOVERNMENT ALL VOTED FOR WAR WITH IRAQ

Two of these three DUP Westminster MPs voted for war in Iraq. The other DUP Wesminister MP “would stand with the Tories” and vote for war in Iraq today !!!


THE LEADER OF THE DUP VOTED FOR ‘WAR WITH IRAQ”

They both voted for “War with Iraq” !!!

Tony Blair was not “straight with the nation” about his decisions in the run up to the Iraq War, the chairman of of the inquiry into the war has told the BBC.


Speaking for the first time since publishig his report a year ago, Sir John Chilcot discussed why he thinks former PM made those decisions.

He said the evidence Mr Blair gave the inquiry was “emotionally truthful” but he relied on beliefs rather than facts.

A spokesman for Mr Blair said “all these issues” had been dealt with. According to the BBC.

With many thanks to: BBC England and BBC NI (North of Ireland) for the origional story.
Hear it from the horses mouth: Tony Blair was not straight with the nation & the inquiry about his decisions in the run up to Iraq War – Sir John Chilcot tells @bbclaurak. https://t.co/dP2CV5kPVY
Watch this YouTube video: https://youtu.be/16BtpSCufU0

Follow these links to find out more: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/jeremy-corbyn-2003-anti-iraq-war-speech-labour-leader-ahead-of-his-time_uk_577bbbe8e4b0f7b55795fa0a

Follow these links to find out more: https://donate.unhcr.org/gb-en/mosul?gclid=Cj0KEQjwv_fKBRCG8a3ao-OQuZ8BEiQAvpHp6DGLC-ZTQVPL79GboChP3RbdTp6IRVxB0TU5CieH9hoaApxA8P8HAQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

Follow these links: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-40510541



DUP hasn’t strayed far away from its origins.

This letter appeared in the Irish News today written from a unionist point-of-view have a read and make up your own minds. “Now For everyone who messaged me when I asked them not to. YOUR PUNISHMENT IS BEING ASKED TOLEAVE MY FACEBOOK ACCOUNT IMEDDITLY. I KNOW  THE PUNISHMENT SEEMS A LITTLE  HARSH BUT ITS FACEBOOK PAGE AND I CAN CHOOSE WHO I WISH TO BE FRIENDS. I HAVE WORKED VERY HARD ON THIS STORY. AND FELL TO SLEEP WHILST WRITING LAST NIGHT. AND TO BE HONEST I DON’T NEED FRIENDS  LIKE YOU. SO GOODBYE.

You are all very brave men and women behind a computer. You know who I mean.


THE DUP ARE NOT WHAT PEOPLE THINK THEY ARE THEY ARE LIERS, CHEATS, ASSOCIATED WITH THE UDA, Red Hand Commando and the UVF. ENGLAND NEED TO KNOW WHO THEY ARE REALLY DEALING WITH THEY ARE THE SCUM OF THE EARTH & DECEATFUL,UNTRUSTWORTHY,AND YOU NEED TO WATCH YOU BACK WITH THEM. DON’T TRUST THEM TO GO INTO GOVERNMENT WITH. THE SECRET DEAL WON’T WORK IN THE NORTH OF IRELAND. BECAUSE SINN FÉIN WILL NOT GO INTO GOVERNMENT WITH THEM. THEY ARE LAYERS. AND WITHOUT A GOVERMENT THEY ARE FU

   


READ THIS FROM SCOTLAND:

SECTARIAN SCOTLAND YOU ARE A SHOWER OF BRAINWASHED NUMPTIES.

I was accused by Sectarian idiots of being an Orange Bastard for going to the Netherlands For Independence Event in April 2017

Yesterday I was accused of being a Fenian Bastard because an Irish band turned up at the Bannockburn Rally. It was a public event I did not invite them.

 

DUP’s Emma ‘Little’ Pengelly criticised over UVF’s flags in a shared neighbourhood.

Emma ‘Little’ Pengelly (on the left) at Downing Street London.

DUP MP Emma Little-Pengelly has been criticised after claiming there was no widespread demand for the removal of UVF flags from a cross-community housing development in Belfast.Paramilitary and other loyalist flags were put up in the Global Crescent and Cantrell Close ‘shared neighbourhoods’ earlier this month.
Two flags have been hung from the majority of lampposts in the area, which is close to Ravenhill Avenue and Woodstock Road.
Global Crescent is a £13m development built by Fold Housing, now known as Radius Housing, as part of the Stormont Executive’s Together Building United Communities (TBUC) strategy.
Ms Little-Pengelly said she visited around 100 homes in the area this week and found mixed views on the flags.
However, Alliance MLA Paula Bradshaw last night claimed some residents may not feel “comfortable” speaking to Ms Little-Pengelly, whose candidacy for the South Belfast Westminster seat was endorsed by a UDA-linked magazine as well as the Loyalist Communities Council, which represents the UDA, UVF and Red Hand Commando.
Earlier this week a spokesman for the DUP said it wanted all paramilitary flags removed without referring specifically to those in the shared developments.
Ms Little-Pengelly later claimed that some local people support the flags.
“There were some people who were very supportive of the flags, people who felt very much it was part of the tradition of the local area and the wider area,” she said.
“The majority of people said to me: ‘We understand that the flags have gone up, but we also understand that they will come back down again’.“Really they didn’t want a public fuss around this matter.”The former Stormont junior minister also said “there were some who had concerns around this, who would prefer for the flags not to be there”.“The way I would put this is that it was a much more complex picture than I was imagining,” she told the BBC.

She later tweeted that “I oppose all paramilitaries in our society, that includes paramilitary flags”.
However, Ms Bradshaw said it was “almost beyond belief” that there was no widespread demand for the flags to be removed.
”Emma Little-Pengelly was a special adviser for the DUP when the TBUC programme was created,” she said.
“Therefore, she should know first-hand how a shared neighbourhood works – it should be welcoming to all and intimidating to none.
“To accept flags marking territory is nothing else than being an apologist to those erecting them, particularly as objective surveys show only a small minority of people support the display.”
She added: “I would be surprised if many residents would feel comfortable telling an MP who was publicly endorsed by paramilitaries only a few weeks ago they were intimidated by a flag glorifying one of those same groups.
“Instead they come to Alliance and others, often confidentially, as we realise people want to see positive community relations and good neighbourliness.”
SDLP assembly member Claire Hanna also described the MP’s comments as “outrageous”.
“These flags are designed to intimidate and divide,” she said.
“In the face of intimidation by paramilitary organisations, it’s no surprise that people are frightened of going public with their concerns on the issue.”
One local resident, who did not want to be named, claimed yesterday that authorities were treating the matter in a similar way to how school bullies.
“It’s easier to put up with a few people being harassed than take action against the people perpetrating it,” she said.
“It stinks to the high heavens that we have this lovely peaceful space and lovely new development and there are sectarian power plays.
“It has really lost the inclusive vibe.”

With many thanks to: Irish News for the original story.

Follow this Link for the full story: http://www.irishnews.com/news/2017/06/21/news/dup-s-emma-little-pengelly-criticised-over-uvf-flags-in-shared-neighbourhood-1062249/

This is a ‘Sunday World’ EXCLUSIVE – “ARLENE’S KILLER DEAL” !

  1. DUP pact may see paramilitary killers escape prosecution.
  2. Gadaffi funds to pay compensation to victims of terror.
  3. £2bn additional funding is pledged for NI infrastructure.

THE DUP and Theresa May have agreed a deal which will see paramilitary killers and ex-soldiers escape prosecution.

The Headlines of the Sunday World as they appeared, the Headline Reading “ARLENE’S KILLER DEAL”. Sunday’s Front Page of one of the biggest selling Sunday newspapers in the North of Ireland.

A beleaguered Mrs May and the DUP are understood to have agreed in principle to place a statute of limitations on historical crimes linked to the Troubles and paramilitaries.

DUP Westminister MP and deputy leader of the DUP is also an leading Orangeman and one of Arlene Foster’s chief negotiators and closest colleague’s.

The agreement could see thousands of unsolved murders remaining on the books, with little or no prospect of anyone being brought before the courts. Insiders say the arrangement stops short of an an amnesty but would leave prosecution extremely unlikely. The Sunday World understands the cut-off date could be as recent as 2012, with any Troubles murders, or those carried out by paramilitaries prior to that date, not being investigated.

The Headlines speak for themselves!

The DUP and the Conservatives have been locked in negotiations since the Tories squeezed home with a vastly reduced majority in last week’s General Election. Mrs May is now dependent on Arlene Foster’s 10 MPs to prop her creaking administration. There has been much speculation about the DUP’s shopping list as they arrived at No 10 but the Sunday World understands a deal on historic prosecutions is a central plank to the new arrangement. It is also understood the government has agreed compensation for victims of terrorist crime, with the funds drawn from an estimated  £9.5 billion in frozen Libyan assets. The UK seized assets from the Colonel Gadaffi regime in 2011, but because of an EU ruling, the government was barred from using it to compensate victims. The DUP has been at the head of a long-running campaign for victims to be compensated with Libyan money because of despot Gadaffi’s support for the IRA. Tons of semtex were shipped from North Africa to be used in terror attacks in the North of Ireland.The UK’s withdrawal from Europe could clear the way for those funds to be accessed.

The story in full as highlighted here.

The government is also examing possible payments to Troubles survivors using recommendations first outlined in the Eames Bradley Report eight years ago. Which proposed all those injured as a result of the conflict receive a one-off payment of £12,000.

The three Westminter MPs pictured here were all endorsed by the Paramilitary UDA. I name them here from left Jeffrey Donaldson, centre Nigel Dodds and right Emma ‘Little’ Pengelly.

It is thought government paymasters are considering a sliding scale pension arrangement, however, the stumbling block could still be the definition of a victim. In the past, the DUP has railed against paramilitaries being placed in the same bracket as civilians who were killed or injured.But it is the prospect of suspected killers escaping prosecution which will cause the most anger. 

Ballymurphy massacre 

The DUP and the Tories have been vocal supporters of a campaign to protect former soldiers from prosecution. A number of ex-squaddies are currently facing charges for Troubles killings. Soldiers involved in Bloody Sunday are facing court action and there has been a long-running campaign to bring paratroopers involved in the Ballymurphy Massacre, which left 11 civilians dead in 1971, before the courts. 

Ballymurphy massacre which left 11 civilians dead in 1971, The same British Army unit of the Paratroopers that murdered the people on Bloody Sunday were also responsible for this massacre.

Sources have told us under the terms of the deal, investigations will not be formally closed and that cases will remain open. But they will not be actively investigated, unless new evidence is brought forward.

Sean Graham bookies massacre that was carried out by ‘paid members of state’ (informers). Working for the British government. Paid for by you!

  • High costs and insufficient resources to run multiple historical inquires will be held up as the reason for the move. It leaves the prospect of atrocities such as Loughinisland, La Mon, the Sean Graham bookies massacre and the Enniskillen bomb remain unsolved. Should Mrs Foster and Mrs May agree, it will place a huge question mark over the Gary Haggarty suppergrass trial which has already been put back on a number of occasions and it will almost certainly scupper any prospect of IRA agent Freddie Scappaticci ever appearing in a British court.
    Gary Haggarty UVF Supergrass. Who is now in hiding from his former colleagues. All exspences paid for by you the British taxpayers. And it runs into millions.

The move will infuriate victims groups who have seen years of failed attempts to win justice for their loved ones. It is not clear if there will be any implications for inquests into historical murders, some of which have been adjourned for more than 40 years, but it effectively removes any chances of charges being brought.

The Enniskillen bombing carried out by the IRA.

Details of the DUP/Tory deal are expected to be released early in the week, with the Queen’s Speech having being rescheduled for Wednsday.

Arelene Foster and Prime Minister Theresa May’s secret hand shakes and deals under the table.

The government is likely to agree to an estimated £2bn in additional funding for infrastructure projects with the transport system, schools and the Health Service top of the list of priorities. On Thursday, DUP deputy leader Nigel Dodds said there was no deadline for a deal between the DUP and the Conservative Party, despite a date being set for the Queen’s Speech. They are allowing themselves sufficient time to agree the more sensitive elements of the agreement.

British Paratroopers posing for a photo in the North of Ireland. The same British Army unit were responsible for Bloody Sunday and also the Ballymurphy massacre.

But as previously revealed, Mrs May will only sign the cheque once the the DUP go back into a power-sharing executive with Sinn Féin. Critics, including former Prime Minister, Sir John Major, have argued a deal could undermine the Peace Process. The 1998 Good Friday Agreement commits the UK and Irish governments to demonstrate “rigorous impartially” in their dealings with the different political traditions in the North of Ireland.

Sinn Féin the biggest Nationalist, so-called Republican Party, in power in the North of Ireland.

On Friday, the DUP switched their attentions to Dublin, with newly-in-stalled Taoiseach (Prime Minister), Leo Varadkar, holding talks with all the two main parties from the North. Mrs Foster emerged from discussions to call for a “sensible Brexit” that works for the North of Ireland and the Republic. She had previously pressed Mrs May for a soft exit from Europe. She was asked if she expected a deal with the Tories within a week and to be the North of Ireland’s First Minister in a fortnight.


She replied: “It takes two to tango and we’re ready to dance.” She described her meeting with Mr Varadkar as “very useful and pleasant”. “We want to see a Brexit that works for everybody, not just in the North of Ireland from my perspective but in the Republic of Ireland as well, so it is about a sensible Brexit,” she said.

I know people want to talk about soft Brexit, hard Brexit, all of these things but what we want to see is a sensible Brexit and one that works for everybody.” It was thought they also discussed attempts to restore power-sharing at Stormont. Sinn Féin also met with the Taoiseach (Prime Minister) on Friday afternoon. 


The party’s Northern Leader Michelle O’Neill, said they remained “committed to making the institutions work”. ” “We also respect other parties’ mandates, we want to get back to an executive that has all the parties around the table to collectively take decisions,” she said.

Michelle Leader of Sinn Féin in the North of Ireland.

Leo Varadkar said he had “two very good meetings with the main parties in the North of Ireland”. “I am encouraged and a little more confident it is going it is going to be possible to re-establish the North of Ireland’s Executive before the deadline of 29th June,” he added.


With many thanks to the: Sunday World for the original story.


Follow this Link to see more leaks of DUP/Tory deal from Monday night:  http://m.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/former-dup-spad-richard-bullick-makes-twitter-debut-hints-at-tellall-book-and-jokes-on-how-he-replaced-rhi-boiler-35813993.html

Follow this Link to find out more information on Michelle O’Neill: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelle_O%27Neill


With many thanks to the: Sunday World and Richard Sullivan for the original story.

Former UUP chairman and chairman of LCC David Campbell resigns from party

Loyalist Communities Council (LCC) was launched on 13th October 2015. With the full backing of the UDA, UVF and Red Hand Commando and was also the group which give it’s full backing to the ten recently elected Unionist DUP Westminster MP’s

David Campbell Chairman of LCC (Loyalist Communities Council).

A former chairman of the Ulster Unionist Party has resigned from the party and accused it of “political mismanagement and amateurism”.

David Campbell had been a party member for 35 years, and served as former leader David Trimble’s chief of staff.

Mr Campbell is also chairman of the Loyalist Communities Council (LCC).

At the launch of the LCC (Loyalist Communities Council) pictured here with three Commanders of the UDA.

The organisation became part of a major controversy during the last election after it endorsed some unionist candidates.

The flag of the LCC (Loyalist Communities Council) but as you can see by by the flag, there’s not much on it to do with the Nationalist community.

The endorsement was rejected by both Robin Swann, the current UUP leader, and his predecessor Mike Nesbitt.

Mr Campbell issued a hard-hitting statement, carried in Friday’s News Letter.

‘Electoral dynamic has changed’

Mr David Campbell Chairman of the Loyalist Communities Council (LCC) who backed all ten DUP Westminster MP’s who are now endorsing the Tory/DUP next Westminister government.

Speaking to the BBC’s Talkback programme, he said the final straws for him were the UUP’s reaction to the LCC’s endorsement of unionist candidates and the “failure to consider a proper electoral pact with the DUP”.

The writing on the walls in the Loyalist Communities it speaks for itself really.

“My personal view is that the party has gone past a tipping point, we did have a period before where we had no MPs before, but we had a strong assembly party,” he said.

“I think the electoral dynamic in Northern Ireland has changed irrevocably following the Sinn Féin success in the pre-emptive assembly election.

“That is pointing to two largely hegemonic parties in respect to nationalist and unionist communities and it is the prime reason that voters flocked to the DUP in this [general] election.”

‘Traditional conservative’

Leading members and Commanding officers of the UDA, at the launch of the LCC back in Oct 2015.

Mr Campbell said there had been a drift away from traditional Ulster Unionist values, with former leader Mike Nesbitt and others declaring themselves liberal unionists.

“The typical Ulster Unionist voter is a church-goer who would be largely traditional conservative in their outlook and they were being presented with, in some cases, candidates espousing a very different view on serious moral issues,” he said.

“The comfort I take in the electoral decline of the Ulster Unionist Party is that the DUP has moved largely exclusively onto Ulster Unionist policy through their acceptance of the agreement and the subsequent power-sharing arrangements and the drift of Ulster Unionism into the DUP.

“I think in the eyes of the average unionist elector the DUP is largely what the Ulster Unionist Party once was.”

When asked if he thought the DUP was now the only viable party of unionism he said: “Undoubtedly, and that’s clearly [a view] shared by the electorate.”

Ulster Unionist councillor David Browne said he did not agree that the party was finished.

“I do believe that the party has changed drastically from the party I joined around 35 years ago and I do agree with some of the comments he made around the previous leadership,” he said.

“Robin Swann is only in the job and in fairness to him I though he’s done a reasonably good job.”

 

Follow these links to find out more about the Loyalist Communities Council (LCC): http://m.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/loyalist-communities-council-launched-with-backing-of-uda-uvf-and-red-hand-commando-31606726.html

The Homepage of LCC: http://www.lcc-ni.com/

The Statement released to the Loyalist Communities by the LCC: http://www.dalaradia.co.uk/?p=701

With many thanks to the: BBC NI for the original story.From the se

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